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By Gini Courter | Thursday, September 24, 2015

Best Practices for Creating a Template in Word

In Microsoft Word, it’s wicked easy to create powerful templates that you can personally reuse or share with other members of your team. The key to creating a template in Word is thinking about how it will be used and handling page and paragraph formatting as part of your template design.

By Jess Stratton | Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Five Must-Know Tips for Word 2016

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Whether you’re new to Microsoft Word or use it daily, here are some must-know tips for getting the most out of your new software.

We’ve got brand new in-depth training in Word 2016 — but these tips also work for previous versions of Word, so you’ll benefit even if you haven’t upgraded yet.

By Toni Saddler-French | Sunday, June 14, 2015

Four Fast Ways to Snazz Up Your Office Docs

improve your office docs

It can be difficult to make your documents interesting and eye-catching when time is limited—and let’s face it, when isn’t time limited?

Perhaps you’re squeezing in a presentation in between projects or writing a report before a meeting …

Here are four tips to help you make your Office docs look better, even when you’re in a time crunch:

By Gini Courter | Monday, May 25, 2015

The Wicked Easy Way to Create a Table of Contents in Word

create a table of contents in word

You already know that a table of contents makes it easier for your readers to work with long documents of 10 or more pages. They give printed documents a sophisticated look and feel, and add ebook-like navigation to onscreen documents.

But did you know that tables of contents are wicked easy to create and update in Microsoft Word? I created the following table of contents with just three clicks—and so can you. Here’s how!

By Starshine Roshell | Sunday, May 10, 2015

From Galloping to Gaga to lynda: A Life Learned Online

2015_05_10_PauletteHero

Paulette Perhach can do a lot of things that most people can’t.

She can carry four full dinner plates at a time. She can gallop on a horse. She can split names into two columns in Excel, craft subplots in a fictional story, and do the dance from Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” video. She can make quail traps, tie fancy bows on presents, and produce podcasts.

And she learned it all online.

Just how did she come to acquire this eclectic set of skills? And well … why?

Having graduated college only to realize that she possessed very few useful life skills, Paulette took to the Internet to fill in the sizeable gaps.

“Before I really took control of my own education, I felt like life was always coming at me: another late bill, another bounced check, another photo from a place I wished I could travel to,” says the Seattle resident. “So I started making it a practice to educate myself for 10 minutes a day.

“And life started getting better …”

By Anne-Marie Concepción | Thursday, April 9, 2015

Using Word and InDesign Together: Avoiding Glitches

2015_04_09_IDSword

I’m on a mission to save InDesign users from the nightmare we know as Word formatting.

I have a whole course on it: Using Word and InDesign Together. But those of you with only a few minutes to spare can watch this week’s episode of InDesign Secrets, where I share fixes for the most annoying Word formatting glitches.

By Adam Wilbert | Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Buy or Rent? Office 365 Subscription vs. Office 2013

office 365 subscription or boxed tools?

The subscription model is here to stay, and that’s a good thing.

When you dig into the benefits of a subscription—and evaluate the actual costs of “buying” versus “renting” your Office software—you might be surprised at what the numbers tell you.

Here’s why I think an Office 365 subscription is an unbeatable deal.

By Alicia Katz Pollock | Friday, February 6, 2015

How to Automate Page Breaks in Word — with Heading Styles

PageBreakHeader

When working on a complex document, it’s common to have each chapter or section start on a new page. Instead of manually inserting Page Breaks in Word, I prefer to create them automatically as soon as I assign a Style to my section title.

That way, there’s never any confusion as to where a page ends. The Page Breaks don’t move around on me. And my formatted text never loses its Style as I add and remove spacing around it.

To automate my Page Breaks, I like to add them right inside my Heading Style definition!

Here’s how:

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