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By Curt Frye | Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Summarize Data with Conditional Functions in Excel

Excel users are often faced with spreadsheets that summarize sales data for multiple areas, such as states within the U.S. or individual countries.

Functions such as SUM or AVERAGE let you summarize your data as a whole—but it can be difficult to find the totals, averages, or counts for subsets of that data. For example, suppose you want to find the total of all sales to Canada. To do that using a standard SUM formula, you would have to identify cells that contain values for all sales to Canada and then create a formula for just those cells.

Fortunately, there’s a set of conditional functions in Excel that let you specify which values should be included in a sum, average, or count calculation. Those functions are: SUMIF, SUMIFS, AVERAGEIF, AVERAGEIFS, COUNTIF, and COUNTIFS.

Here’s how to take advantage of them:

By Curt Frye | Tuesday, January 27, 2015

How to Create Pivot Tables in Excel 2010

Excel workbooks let you summarize your data using a powerful set of built-in functions and features such as sorting and filtering.

That said, basic worksheets are static and make rearranging data difficult. Fortunately, there’s a way to avoid all that cutting and pasting: Pivot Tables.

You can learn everything you’d ever want to know from my lynda.com courses Excel 2007: PivotTables for Data AnalysisExcel 2010: PivotTables in Depthand Excel 2013: PivotTables in Depth.

But here’s a quick-start guide for you:

By Curt Frye | Thursday, June 26, 2014

Getting Started with Excel VBA

excel-cells-in-repose

Excel is a powerful and versatile tool you can use to analyze data—but not every capability you might want is built in.

Using the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language, you can script custom processes in Excel. VBA is an object-oriented language, which means that elements of Excel—such as workbooks, worksheets, and the program itself—are represented as objects. An object has three main components:

  • properties, which describe the object
  • methods, which are things the object can do
  • events, which are occurrences the object can recognize and react to

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