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By Robbie Carman | Friday, September 25, 2015

Which Video Monitor Do You Want on Set?

video monitor

Monitors, monitors, monitors. They help you catch things you might not ordinarily see with the naked eye.

There are a multitude of monitors out there ranging from small field monitors to 4K monitors to computer displays. Which one is right for you?

This week on Video Gear Weekly, Rich and I show you a few of the latest possibilities to help you figure out which monitor could benefit your workflow.

By Richard Harrington | Friday, June 26, 2015

Calibrate Monitor Displays with a Colorimeter

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Calibrate your monitors as accurately as possible by using colorimeters or spectroradiometers.

This week on Video Gear Weekly, Rich and Robbie show you how to calibrate your display with a meter.

By Kristin Ellison | Thursday, September 12, 2013

Why spot colors are necessary

Why spot colors are necessary

Explore this course at lynda.com.

Why do we need spot colors? It’s because humans can see a wide range of colors—some say 10 million shades—but there’s a limit to what we can print in CMYK, the industry-standard combination of cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks. This is where spot colors – absolute colors generated by a specific ink – come in to fill the gaps.

CMYK has its limits The diagram below represents the range of colors humans can see. You’ll notice that what we can see on a monitor, and what the CMYK offset printing process is capable of reproducing, is less than what spot colors (the “PANTONE gamut” in the diagram below) can achieve. Bright oranges and navy blues can be especially challenging.

By Robbie Carman | Friday, September 6, 2013

Use a field monitor for better shots: DSLR Video Tips

DSLR Video Tips: Using peaking and focus in red

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

A common phrase among DSLR pros is that “everything looks good on the back of the camera LCD.” While intended as a joke, the phrase really means that it’s hard to judge aspects of your shot like critical focus, color, and exposure using the LCD on the back of a DSLR camera. As these LCDs are generally very small, it can also be difficult for on-set clients and team members (like a focus puller) to clearly see what the camera is actually shooting.

That’s where field monitors come in. Over the past few years, lightweight field monitors offering flexible connectivity, high-resolution large screens, and extensive features have become more affordable. This week, we’ll explore the benefits of using a field monitor, including

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