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By Scott Fegette | Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Use Your Apple Devices Together with Handoff

Use Handoff for Apple devices

When the apps we use day-to-day are scattered across phones, tablets, laptops, and desktop computers—things can get confusing.

You might start an email on your iPhone, but after a page of painful texting, realize it would be easier to finish it on your laptop. Or you might have left a document open on your office computer upstairs, but you need to access it from your tablet while taking a phone call downstairs. If you’ve got more than one device, you can probably relate.

Apple’s recent releases of OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 tackle this digital dilemma with a new feature called Handoff, which allows you to easily, well, “hand off” certain tasks between devices.

For example, open your MacBook Pro’s current browser tab on your iPhone. Pass that spreadsheet on your iPhone to your iPad Air for a bit more breathing room. Respond to that desktop IM message on your iPhone.

It’s a pretty compelling promise—but does Handoff walk the walk? Let’s set it up, and take a look.

By Simon Allardice | Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Want to Become an App Developer? Learn Swift

become an app developer

This month, Stack Overflow announced the results of its 2015 Developer Survey. As part of the survey, nearly 30,000 software developers were asked which programming language they most want to continue using. At the top of that list—called the “Most Loved” category—is Swift.

That’s impressive for a language that’s not even a year old. But it doesn’t surprise me at all.

In a 30-year career, I’ve needed to learn, use, and sometimes discard many programming languages. And Swift is the most fun I’ve had with any of them.

If you think you might want to become an app developer, here’s why you should be looking at Swift.

By Jeff Carlson | Friday, February 13, 2015

Photos for OS X: What You Need to Know

Photos for OS X Beta

Last week, Apple re-revealed Photos for OS X, the Mac counterpart to the Photos app on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Available now as a preview for developers, Photos for OS X will be included with OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 in the spring.

Apple first teased Photos for OS X at its Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) last June, and a month later announced that iPhoto and Aperture were being retired. In the interim, we’ve been left wondering what the replacement will be like:

Will it open existing iPhoto and Aperture libraries? Will Photos replace all of Aperture’s professional organizing and editing features?

Now we have a better idea of what’s coming. The Photos for OS X app will be immediately familiar, as it echoes (but doesn’t completely duplicate) the Photos for iOS app. It does open iPhoto and Aperture libraries, and even does so without duplicating your images.

However, that’s about as far as Photos goes when it comes to Aperture. The new application is a clear message—the latest in a string of messages over the years, really—that Apple is no longer pursuing the professional photographer market.

If you currently use iPhoto or Aperture to manage and edit your photo library, it’s time to start thinking about how Photos will fit into your workflow—which may involve migrating to a non-Apple application.

By Alicia Katz Pollock | Thursday, December 25, 2014

Open Anything in One Click Using Your Mac Dock

Use the Mac dock to clean up your desktop

Is your Mac desktop covered with icons?

You may think this gives you easy access to your most-used applications, files, and folders. But in fact, you’re working outside your Mac’s built-in file management system. It’s a bad habit you may have brought over from your Windows days—and Apple has better options.

I’m going to show you how to clean up your desktop while customizing your Mac Dock for one-click access to every file, folder, and app on your computer.

By Scott Fegette | Wednesday, December 24, 2014

How to Take a Screenshot on a Mac

snagit_main_ui

It’s said that a picture’s worth a thousand words, and when you need to communicate what’s happening on your Mac screen, getting a clear screenshot of what you’re talking about can make all the difference.

Taking a screenshot in OS X isn’t difficult if you know the “secret key combinations”, but they’re not as obvious as the Print Screen key on Windows systems. For the Mac power user, there are also several handy utilities that can supercharge your screenshots with annotations, graphics, and various ways of sharing. Here are some great options for taking a screenshot on a Mac.

By Scott Fegette | Friday, September 5, 2014

Look What's Familiar, and Simple, About Swift

swift_hero_image

Swift, the new programming language by Apple for rapid development of iOS and Mac OSX apps, is gaining popularity as quickly as its name suggests—and we’re pleased to announce that Simon Allardice’s first lynda.com course on the language, Swift Programming First Look, is now available.

If you’ve been itching to dive into this new language, Simon’s got the scoop for you- here’s a peek.

By Scott Fegette | Friday, June 13, 2014

Swift: A New Programming Language

Apple's Swift: A New Programming Language

Swift is a new programming language developed by Apple for iOS and OS X app development, which builds on the best parts of many popular languages like Objective-C, Ruby, Python, C# and more. Announced at Apple’s annual WWDC developer conference this year, Swift is the culmination of years of “skunkworks” development alongside optimizations made to Apple’s SDKs and developer tools.

By Jess Stratton | Monday, October 21, 2013

Organize your Operating System: Monday Productivity Pointers

smartfolder

Both Windows and Mac OS come with a built-in means of organizing your files; they both have pre-built folders for music, videos, pictures, and documents. This way, when you have to choose a file location to store your files (such as photos and downloaded songs), you’ll automatically have somewhere to put them.

But this system gets confusing if you already have your own storage folders, for example, from a cloud service like Dropbox or Google Drive. To make matters more complicated, if you need to search for a file, you now have to search in multiple locations.

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