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By Tim Grey | Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Batch Processing in Adobe Camera Raw

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One of the best-kept secrets of Adobe Camera Raw is that you can process multiple photos in batch, synchronizing settings across multiple images, and even fine-tuning the settings for each image individually. This provides a workflow that’s easy and efficient to implement—especially compared to using an action for batch processing multiple images within Photoshop.

I recommend getting started in Adobe Bridge, where you can make use of the Filter panel (available from the Window menu) to filter images, selecting those you want to process. This generally involves images of the same basic subject that were captured at about the same time, with the same overall lighting conditions and exposure settings.

By Vincent Versace | Friday, May 2, 2014

Rename Your Photos with Adobe Bridge

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Locating and identifying one of your photos using the default camera file name is an exercise in futility; it just doesn’t work.

Using dedicated photo management software is one solution—but it comes at a price. And depending which software vendor you choose, that price could be an ongoing subscription fee that many photographers dislike.

But if you already have a version of Photoshop, then you have all the tools you need to batch rename your photos and give them more meaningful names.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, September 12, 2013

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

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Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

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