Using delay timing variations


show more Using delay timing variations provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Mixing Bootcamp show less
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Using delay timing variations

Sometimes a delay fits in the mix better with other note denominations such as triplets or dotted notes. In this video, I am going to show you how to do that and you will hear what they sound like. Dotted note denominations can be determined by using the following formula. Delay Time x 1.5 equals the dotted value. For example, 480ms, which is the quarter note 125 BPM delay from the previous example, times 1.5 equals 720ms. That's a dotted quarter note. For a triplet denomination, use this formula.

Delay Time x .667 equals the triplet value. For example, 480ms, which is a quarter note 125 BPM delay, times .667 equals 320 ms or a quarter note triplet. As with the straight quarter and 8th and 16th notes, you can continually divide the dotted or triplet values in half until you get the desired denomination. While the straight note denominations of quarter, 8th, 16th, and so on can provide depth in a track, triplet and dotted note denominations are great for adding glue.

They can make a track ...

Using delay timing variations
Video duration: 2m 51s 8h 53m Beginner

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Using delay timing variations provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Mixing Bootcamp

Subject:
Audio + Music
Software:
Pro Tools
Author:
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