Adding delay to the vocals


show more Adding delay to the vocals provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Mixing Bootcamp show less
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Adding delay to the vocals

Both lead and background vocals are frequently the primary recipients of some sort of delay in the mix. For a lead vocal, it can provide a sense of space and polish without pushing it too far back in the mix. For the background vocals, it can be a way to distinguish them from the lead vocal. In this movie, I'm going to demonstrate just how different types of vocal delays sound in the mix. So first of all let's listen to the vocal in the track without any kind of delay on it. (Music playing) The first thing we'll do is we'll solo it up and we already have our three delays set up from another movie, so we're going to use the Haas effect first.

And this is on Bus 19, which is already preset. Let's hear what it sounds like. (Music playing) Now what a Haas effect is, it's a delay of 40 milliseconds or less and the reason why is anything above 40 seconds sounds like a very distinct event. So in other words we'd definitely hear the delay. When it gets below 40 millise...

Adding delay to the vocals
Video duration: 8m 43s 8h 53m Beginner

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Adding delay to the vocals provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Mixing Bootcamp

Subject:
Audio + Music
Software:
Pro Tools
Author:
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