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How to Add Shapes in Your PowerPoint Presentations


show more Adding shapes provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by David Diskin as part of the PowerPoint 2010 Essential Training show less
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Adding shapes

This chapter is all about Shapes in PowerPoint: how we can add them, format them, move them around, position them on top of each other and animate them. But let's take a step back for just a moment. What is a Shape, and why do we even care? Shapes are any object, such as an arrow, circle or a rectangle, that we use for annotation, or to build a diagram. Shapes also include text boxes, like the placeholders that we've been using, as well as freestanding text. Nearly everything that we can do with a shape, like animation, we can do with photos, charts and other objects.

Let's try a few examples, and I think you'll get the hang of it. It's time to show our employees our Web site and discuss a few of its features. Slide number 9 already has a page dedicated to our Web site, but the graphic is missing. Let's add that real fast from my Assets folder. We will choose Insert > Picture, navigate to our Assets folder, and we will find a file called Website. Remember that when we resize anything we should always use the corner handles.

We don't want our Web site image to be skewed. I am going to place the Website image here and then resize the text box so that text wraps along its side, move it up a little bit, and it's in place. Now I want to draw some Shapes on my Website image. Shapes can be added from the Home tab here, or the Insert tab here. Notice the gallery of Shapes available to us: rectangles, ovals, rounded rectangles, stars, arrows, lines, curvy lines, squiggly lines, all sorts of shapes.

Let's start things off with an arrow, so they can draw attention to the Shop button of our Web site. When I found the shape that, I want I give it a click. Notice how my pointer now looks like crosshairs. I position my pointer wherever I want that shape to appear, and then I click and hold and then drag. I haven't let go of the mouse button yet. When I do, it'll create that shape, and don't worry if you don't get it right the first time. You can always move and resize at anytime. I let go, and there is my shape.

I would also like to place a star next to our Flavor of the Month game. Again, I'll pull down the Shapes menu, find the star, select it, point to where I want the star to be created, click and hold, then let go. I'll do this one more time, this time from the Home tab. I'll find the Oval icon, select it and then drag that oval into existence, click, holding and then letting go, all right. So the circle around our Web site address didn't quite go as planned.

But now we know how to add shapes, and it wasn't too hard. One quick tip: You can delete a shape just by selecting it and pressing Delete on your keyboard. In our next video, we will take care of that circle as well as a few other details.

Adding shapes
Video duration: 3m 0s 3h 24m Beginner

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Adding shapes provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by David Diskin as part of the PowerPoint 2010 Essential Training

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