The physiology of black and white


show more The physiology of black and white provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Ben Long as part of the Foundations of Photography: Black and White show less
please wait ...

The physiology of black and white

Like your digital camera, the back of your eye has an area of light-sensitive material on it. Unlike your camera though, the material in your eye is covered with four types of light-sensitive cells. There are three types of cones, each sensitive to either red, green, or blue, and there are rods, which have no ability to perceive color. Instead, rods are sensitive only to brightness. In other words, they see the world in black and white. Because they can't detect color, rods may not sound as glamorous as cones, but consider this: 98% of the light-sensitive cells in your eyes are rods. That's right.

The substantial majority of your vision is black-and-white vision. Thanks to all those rods, that human eye is incredibly sensitive to changes in brightness, and this sensitivity is there for a reason. Your rods help with your spacial awareness. They are a big part of your navigation system that keep you from bumping into things, and they help you see in the dark, and I mean dark. Once li...

The physiology of black and white
Video duration: 2m 22s 3h 4m Intermediate

Viewers:

The physiology of black and white provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Ben Long as part of the Foundations of Photography: Black and White

Subject:
Photography
Software:
Photoshop
Author:
please wait ...