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Monitoring the shot in the car


show more Monitoring the shot in the car provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Richard Harrington as part of the Shooting a Hyperlapse Time-Lapse Video show less
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Monitoring the shot in the car

Now, couple things I've learned through the course of shooting with this for the last couple of days. One, don't run the same GPS at the same time while you're using Trigger Trap. We were using my phone for GPS and occasionally, the camera was going crazy. Well, think about it. When the GPS on your phone starts to talk to you with directions, it's sending data out over the same cable that Trigger Trap is sending out information. So, it's impacting the interval shooting. So, I'm going to make sure I actually quit that search for now.

So, I'll just go ahead and quit the GPS maps application, and go back. And, you're now seeing it's running pretty smoothly. Another thing to be careful of is setting too short of an interval. So, let's switch this for a second to something really short, like every 30 meters. Keep in mind that that's only 100 feet, and we're in a car going 70 plus miles an hour. I'll hit return. Let's mark that as a new shot. It's doing okay, but it might run out of buffer here in a little bit.

Not too bad. See? Hit a buffer issue. It's going to keep running okay and then it's going to have to pause for a second once it fills up. So it is possible to set the interval too short when doing distance time lapse. So, let's change that to 75 meters. Click okay. And re-engage our hyper lapse. Good. What I'm doing is keeping an eye on, as the distance meter goes around that the shot is consistently triggering. Seems good. Alright, I'm happy with that, let's get the phone outta hand.

Looking at the shot on the screen, everything looks good. You're going to want to keep an eye on the camera from time to time. If you need to temporarily stop it you can do that, stop it on the phone, and feel free to take a look at your exposure meter. I'm shooting just a little bit under. And with the bright sky here, I think it's easier to recover some of the slightly underexposed areas and make sure the sky looks beautiful. That's the hardest part to get right. Now today is a cool winter sky, we don't have any clouds up there.

It's a little bit hazy. So, it's important that I find a good balance to keep that sky just a little bit underexposed. Also, sometimes you camera may have an advance setting. In this case, I have an s curve that I can assign. And what I did, I pulled the highlights down and boosted the shadows up. Again, keeping the detail in the sky, while lifting some of the shadowy-er areas as we're passing through rocks or parts of the mountain. Alright, seems great. The go pro's going strong. No power issues on any of these things.

So, we're just going to sit back and keep rolling for the rest of the trip. And when I get back from this trip, we'll head into the studio and I'll show you how to do the post-production, and put all the pieces together.

Monitoring the shot in the car
Video duration: 3m 11s 1h 33m Intermediate

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Monitoring the shot in the car provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Richard Harrington as part of the Shooting a Hyperlapse Time-Lapse Video

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