Linking vs. embedding media


show more Linking vs. embedding media provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by Alicia Katz Pollock as part of the PowerPoint 2010: Audio and Video in Depth show less
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Linking vs. embedding media

As you build your presentation, you'll insert any number of graphics, movies, sounds, and pictures. You may either embed the assets directly into your PowerPoint file or you could link to the files instead. Let's explore the ins and outs of these two approaches. Embedding is what happens by default when I add any multimedia files to my presentation. Embed means that the element will be imported and saved inside the PowerPoint file. The benefit of embedding is that all the assets are in one place and can't get lost. But the drawback is that every element's file size adds to the total size of your presentation.

In other words, if I insert a 20 megabyte video into my slideshow then my file is now at least 20 megabytes in size. Huge files can lead to PowerPoint slowing down or crashing. Let's see this in action. I'm going to open up the folder where I have my files. I can see that my PowerPoint presentation, 01_03_linkembed, is 723 kilobytes. The first video that we'...

Linking vs. embedding media
Video duration: 8m 33s 4h 38m Intermediate

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Linking vs. embedding media provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by Alicia Katz Pollock as part of the PowerPoint 2010: Audio and Video in Depth

Subject:
Business
Software:
PowerPoint
Author:
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