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Examining the basic system preferences


show more Examining the basic system preferences provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by Christopher Breen as part of the Mac OS X Mountain Lion Essential Training show less
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Examining the basic system preferences

We'll now visit some of the basic preferences found in the System section of System Preferences, and that would be Date & Time and Startup Disk. So here's Date & Time in the System section. This is pretty straightforward. Here's where you can set the date and time. Now, by default, it will be set automatically, and you have a few servers that you can choose from based on where you're located. If you turn this off, then you have the option to manually change the date and time. I'll leave that on.

You can change the format of date and time, by clicking on the Open Language & Text button, and then choosing Region, and this is something we'll look at later. Then there's Time Zone. This, too, is very straightforward. You can set your Time Zone automatically using current location, or you can simply click where you are, if you're in the East Coast, for example, we're not, we're in the West Coast. And you could also choose a major city from the list that pops up here or you can type one in. And then there's Clock, so you can show the date and time in the Menu Bar and that could either be digital or analog.

In time, you could display the time in seconds, Flash the time separator, you can use a 24-hour clock. And if you're not using this 24-hour clock, you can show AM and PM. You could show the day of the week, or I can turn that off, or you can show the longer date. If you like, the Mac will tell you the time, and we're going to talk about Voice in another movie. Turn that off so you won't be distracted.

Then let's take a look at Startup Disk. The Startup Disk preference is where you choose the volume from which your Mac will boot. Now, if you only have one bootable hard drive, as we do on this particular Mac, it won't show you anything else, but you may have more than one disk or bootable volume, and if so, this is where you would choose it. You can also enable Target Disk Mode, so you could string a Thunderbolt, if your Mac supports it, or a FireWire cable between two Macs. So one in disk mode will appear as an external hard drive, and the way you do that is when you restart that Mac, you hold down the T key on your keyboard.

It will launch and it will show the FireWire symbol, or the Thunderbolt symbol, depending on which kind of Mac you have. At that point, the other Mac will see it as an external hard drive that you can access and do things with. This is useful for installing stuff on another Mac or when you can't boot that other Mac and you need to troubleshoot it. And that covers the basic preferences in the System area.

Examining the basic system preferences
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Examining the basic system preferences provides you with in-depth training on Business. Taught by Christopher Breen as part of the Mac OS X Mountain Lion Essential Training

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