Using common vintage-modeled EQs


show more Using common vintage-modeled EQs provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Brian Lee White as part of the Foundations of Audio: EQ and Filters show less
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Using common vintage-modeled EQs

Sometimes I want an EQ that's extremely transparent, almost clinical in its application. This sort of tool is great when I don't want to hear the EQ working on the signal. I just want clean boost or cut without adding any additional character or driving any additional harmonics. Other times, I'm looking to add a little extra something to my signals, in addition to just basic boost or cut of frequencies, and this is when I employ model vintage EQs in my workflow. You have to understand that a DAW's recording and mixing facilities are extremely transparent.

Even the channel strip EQ and compression rarely add any additional artifacts or color to the signal. Personally, I think this is a good thing, because it gives me total control over my sonic aesthetic. When I do want to color a signal, drive the harmonic series, and pick up some extra character, I often use classic EQs in my tracks. With these, I get sort of a two-for-one situation, by utilizing the EQ controls I need to sh...

Using common vintage-modeled EQs
Video duration: 5m 2s 2h 29m Appropriate for all Updated Jan 17, 2014

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Using common vintage-modeled EQs provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Brian Lee White as part of the Foundations of Audio: EQ and Filters

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Audio + Music
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