Understand and Use De-essers to Mix Sound and Music


show more Understanding and using de-essers provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Brian Lee White as part of the Foundations of Audio: Compression and Dynamic Processing show less
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Understanding and using de-essers

Sibilance is a term that usually refers to the hissing effect produced when a vocalist speaks or sings a hard S sound. This S sound can be overwhelming and irritating and could be especially bad when certain singers are recorded with less-than-optimal microphones. Hi-hat cymbals and some other high- frequency instruments can also create sibilance. The challenge to eliminate this unwanted sound is so prominent in the recording world that a specific type of dynamics processor was developed to tackle it, called a de-esser.

In a typical compression or limiting scenario we know that the processor looks for and reacts to a signal's amplitude going over the defined threshold. It doesn't matter if that signal is a low-frequency signal or a high-frequency signal, a bass note or treble note. Any amplitude value measured over the threshold will cause the compressor to react and reduce the gain as prescribed by the ratio, attack, and release controls. But what about special scenarios where we...

Understanding and using de-essers
Video duration: 3m 46s 2h 25m Appropriate for all Updated Jan 10, 2014

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Understanding and using de-essers provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Brian Lee White as part of the Foundations of Audio: Compression and Dynamic Processing

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Audio + Music
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