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Using autoleading with inline graphics


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Using autoleading with inline graphics

Earlier in this chapter, I said don't use auto-leading, and then I followed that up by saying unless you're working with inline graphics, so here is that exception to the rule when you might want to use, and in fact, when it's desirable to use auto-leading. So I'm using this document here. It's the same document we saw in the previous movie, and these screen captures are inline graphics, so it's a good document to make my point with. These have been inserted into the flow of the text, and that means that if I move my text content around, then the graphics are going to move with the flow of the text, rather than me having to move the text, then reposition the graphics, which gets very old very quickly.

How do we achieve this? Well, we achieve it by anchoring these images into the flow of the text. There are two different categories of inline or anchored graphics; there are those that are inline, where they are just essentially on a blank line of type, and there are those that are anchored, and the anchored images may be offset from the text itself. These are of the first category, where the images are just cut and pasted onto a line of type. So let me just backwards engineer this to show you how we got to this point.

I'm going to select this graphic, and cut it, and then paste it, and when I paste it, it becomes an independent graphic. I'll now turn on my guides by pressing W, and I will also turn on my hidden characters. So I have a blank line right there, and that blank line is set to auto-leading, and this is where auto-leading is useful. In fact, if we set this to something other than auto-leading, we'll see how inline graphics can actually be very confusing.

So I'm now going to cut that, and I am going to insert my cursor before that hidden character, and then I'm going to paste it. Okay. So what happens when we're using leading values other than auto is that the image, if it's a large image -- and in this case, it is -- is going to overlap the preceding lines, essentially making our type unreadable. So let me undo that, and before I paste it, I'm going to set the leading value to Auto, and then I'll paste the graphic, and then the height of the line will adjust according to the height of the graphic.

So that is when auto-leading is very useful. And if you are working with a document that requires the use of inline graphics, then it's a good idea to make an inline graphic paragraph style. That's what I've done here, and if we take a look at the definition of that, we can see the basic character formats; it's set up with auto-leading. Remember, whenever you see your Leading value in parentheses, that indicates auto-leading. But also, I have changed the percentage of auto-leading; I have set it to 100%, just to make sure that there is not so much room above and below that graphic.

So there is the exception to the rule don't use auto-leading. Use auto-leading with inline graphics.

Using autoleading with inline graphics
Video duration: 3m 12s 9h 7m Intermediate Updated Nov 12, 2014

Viewers:

Using autoleading with inline graphics provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Nigel French as part of the InDesign Typography (2012)

Subject:
Design
Software:
InDesign
Author:
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