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How to Use Draw Inside and Draw Behind Modes in Illustrator


show more The Draw Inside and Draw Behind modes provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Mordy Golding as part of the Illustrator CS5 Essential Training show less
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The Draw Inside and Draw Behind modes

When you're creating artwork inside of Illustrator, you'll find that there are several different drawing modes that can help you do your work. These drawing modes are actually new inside of Illustrator CS5. And you'll find the controls for these drawing modes at the bottom of your Tools panel. There are three icons here. The first one is called Draw Normal. This is the way that Illustrator has always been drawing graphics over the years. However now in CS5 there are two additional drawing modes. One is called Draw Behind and the other one is called Draw Inside.

So in this movie we'll take a look at how to use these drawing modes, and we'll find out when they might be useful. So the first thing to note right now is that of the three drawing modes one of these is grayed out. That's the last one called Draw Inside. Now what Draw Inside allows you to do is it allows you to take a certain shape and then draw other artwork inside of that shape. Obviously in order to use this Drawing mode, I need to first make a selection to let Illustrator know which object I want to draw inside of.

So currently in my document I don't have any artwork selected, so that mode is grayed out. But if I did want to draw inside of a shape, for example maybe this flower shape right here, if I select it, I'll now see that this option for Draw Inside is now available. Now we know that inside of Illustrator there is something called the stacking Order. Objects appear either on top of or beneath other objects. In the case of this example right here where I have three different flowers, they all overlap each other, and some flowers are in the front, for example like this one right here, and some are in the back, like this one over here.

Normally when you work inside of Illustrator, as you draw new shapes, those shapes get added to the top of the stacking order. However if you want to draw a shape to appear behind or beneath other objects, the steps you needed to actually do to get that effect would be to first draw your shape and then once you've created it you would then select it and choose an option to send it to the back. It's just an extra step. Well in Illustrator CS5 this new drawing mode over here called Draw Behind allows you to select artwork and rather than have new objects appear at the top of the stacking order, new objects that you create are actually drawn at the bottom of the stacking order.

So let's take a few moments to see how these might be useful. First of all I think you are going to find that it's a pain to have to come down to the bottom of the Tools panel every time you want to change some of these modes. So it's important to learn the keyboard shortcut, which is Shift+D on your keyboard. Notice that right now I am in the Draw Behind mode. If I hit Shift+D again I am now back to the Draw Normal mode. That's because I don't have any artwork selected. But now let me choose a piece of artwork. So now all three drawing modes are now available. So now if I press Shift+D, I'm going to cycle through these different drawing modes.

Right now I am in the Draw Behind mode. I'll hit Shift+D again. Now I am inside the Draw Inside mode. Notice that Illustrator throws up these little doted lines around the corners of my artwork, to indicate that that is the artwork that I am now going to be drawing inside of. If I press Shift+D again, I'll return back to the Draw Normal mode. So as you are working and you want to dance between these different drawing modes, using the keyboard shortcut of Shift+D will be really useful. Great! Now that we understand that, let's take a look at how we might use Draw Behind for some cool examples.

I am going to press Shift+D. I'm now in the Draw Behind mode. One thing that I do want to note and you have to kind of be careful about this. Illustrator does not indicate in any way whatsoever on your artboard that you're currently now inside of Draw Behind mode. In fact the only way to know that is to take a look at the bottom of the Tools panel, and see that right now the middle icon is currently lit up. Even when you're in Draw Inside mode, Illustrator throws up those little dashed lines around the corners of your artwork. so you'll always know that you're inside of Draw Inside mode. But you might get sometimes confused between Draw Normal and Draw Behind.

It's just something to pay attention to. But for now I am inside of Draw Behind mode and I want to actually create some leaves that will appear kind of sticking out behind these flowers right here. So rather than have to draw them first and then send them to the back now that I am inside of Draw Behind mode, I could take my Pen tool. And I'll start clicking let's say right about over here. I'll move over here and create a shape over here for some kind of a leaf and continue that shape just like this. And I'll go to my Swatches panel here and choose a green color.

Maybe something a little bit more bright here. Great! So notice that even though I have created my shape all the way here into this piece of artwork, since it's at the bottom of the Stacking Order I only see it visible peeking out over here from beneath the flowers. Let's create another leaf over here maybe on this side. I'll click once here to create my shape. I'll click and drag over here and then once again create another kind of leaf, say just like that. I'll add one more leaf down over here so I am just going to click, drag over here, back here.

And because I'm now inside of Draw Behind mode it's much easier for me to create this artwork that's already in the right position in the stacking order. So great! I am going to deselect this artwork now. I am going to switch back to my Selection tool here. And I have created my leaves but I also want to create some kind of a design or pattern inside of one of the flowers. Maybe I want to create something abstract here. So I just want to put a whole bunch of lines inside of this flower right here to add some texture to it. So what I'll start by doing is first selecting the flower that I want to work with. This is the flower that I want to draw inside of.

And now I am going to press Shift+D to now switchover to the Draw Inside mode. I'll switch to the Line Segment tool, and then I'll simply click-and-drag right here across the shape to draw my first line. Notice that even though the line itself starts here and ends here, it's only visible inside of this shape. I'd like to change some of its attributes. So I am going to crank up the stroke weight just a little bit, maybe around 5 points. And I'll change the stroke color to something a little bit more bright, for example this bright green right over here.

Now I am still inside of my Draw Inside mode so I am going to add a few more of these. I am going to click and drag on my artboard here to add some more. Notice that as I am drawing I only see the artwork appear inside of that flower shape. Now I want to toggle over here, once I deselect my artwork, into Outline mode, which is Command+Y or Ctrl+Y on Windows, so that you can see all the lines that I created are still here. Let me go back and press Command+Y again to return back to Preview mode. And what happened here is that Illustrator turned that flower shape into a mask.

As we will learn in a chapter later on inside of this video title, a mask allows us to clip artwork so that we only see a portion of it. Rather than have to manually create a mask, by simply toggling over to the Draw Inside mode Illustrator took care of all that for me. Once you are in Draw Inside mode you can either press Shift+D to return back to Draw Normal mode or you can double- click on any area outside of those double lines to also return yourself back to the Draw Normal mode. So as you work inside of Illustrator, you may find yourself constantly moving between these different drawing modes.

Draw Normal, where everything that you draw gets added to the top of your stacking order. Draw Behind, which is the exact opposite. All new shapes appear at the bottom of the stacking order. And then finally Draw Inside, which allows you to instantly create shapes and draw artwork that's clipped inside of another shape.

The Draw Inside and Draw Behind modes
Video duration: 7m 34s 10h 37m Beginner

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The Draw Inside and Draw Behind modes provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Mordy Golding as part of the Illustrator CS5 Essential Training

Subject:
Design
Software:
Illustrator
Author:
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