Adding a Filmic Glow to Your Footage Using Final Cut Pro

with Chris Meyer and Trish Meyer
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Adding a Filmic Glow to Your Footage Using Final Cut Pro
Video duration: 0s 16m 58s Intermediate

Viewers:

Adding a Filmic Glow to Your Footage Using Final Cut Pro was created and produced by Trish and Chris Meyer. We are honored to host their material in the lynda.com Online Training Library®.

One of Chris Meyer's favorite tricks is a technique for adding the glowing highlights and richly saturated colors often associated with footage shot on film. This trick originated as a way to compensate for the flatness of unaltered 3D renders, but it can be used to improve any source video, whether shot on DV, HDV, or even film. The effect can be achieved in many video editing and motion graphics applications using the same basic approach: duplicate the source footage, mix it back on top of itself using blend modes, then apply a blur or similar effect to the duplicate footage. In Adding a Filmic Glow to Your Footage Using Final Cut Pro, Chris demonstrates the specific tools and techniques for achieving this effect in Final Cut Pro.

Topics include:
  • Duplicating clips and treating entire sequences
  • Applying composite modes
  • Puffing out the highlights
  • Balancing shadows and highlights
  • Using Levels to focus the effect
  • Employing other filters, such as Zoom and Prism
Subject:
Video
Software:
Final Cut Pro
Authors:

Welcome

(mysterious instrumental music) - [Voiceover] Hi, I'm Chris Myer and I wanna share with you one our favorite tricks. It's a technique for adding the glowing highlights and more richly saturated colors that many people associate with footage that was originally shot on film. Now this trick originated as a way of improving 3D renders. You'd be surprised how flat a 3D render can look without any additional treatment. But in reality, the same trick can be used on almost any footage, footage shot on DV, HDV, even footage that was originally shot on film.

The core of this technique involves duplicating the source footage, mixing it back on top of itself using blending modes, and then applying a blur or similar treatment to the duplicate footage. So let's dive in and see exactly how you do this.

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