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Fix red-eye, Improve skies, and Touch up photos Photoshop Elements 10


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Fixing red-eye, improving skies, and touching up photos

In the toolbar in the Quick Photo Edit Workspace, there are four special touchup tools that you can use to adjust just part of an image. Two of those are for use with portraits: the Red Eye Removal tool and the Whiten Teeth tool. Then there's a Blue Sky tool that you can use to make dull skies blue without affecting the rest of an image, and the Black And White adjustment tool which you can use to turn part of an image black-and-white. Let's start with that tool. I'll select it here in the toolbox. Then I'll move over the image.

You can see the size of my brush tip here in this large circle. I like to use this tool with a small brush tip, so I'm going to make the brush tip smaller by pressing the left bracket key on my keyboard several times. The left bracket key is located just to the right of the P key on the keyboard. If I were to press the right bracket key, the brush tip would get a little bigger. Then I'm just going to click and drag over the background of this photo. When I do that, Elements automatically selects the background and converts it to black-and-white at the same time.

I can add to this selection by clicking and dragging over more of the photo, and if I happen to go a little bit too far like this and include some of the rose, I can subtract the rose from the selection by going up to the Options bar for this tool and choosing Subtract from selection, and then coming back in and moving over the area that I want to remove from the black-and-white selection. And then if I need to add some back in, I'll go back up to the Options bar and I'll choose the Add to selection icon. I am going to make my brush tip smaller pressing the left bracket key and I'll add this little bid in to the area that's been converted to black-and-white.

When I'm done, I'll deselect by going to the Select menu and choosing Deselect. The next touchup tool works pretty much the same way but will give you a completely different effect and that is the Make Dull Skies Blue tool. I'll select that and I'm going to bring up another image, one that has sky in it, by double clicking this photo thumbnail in my Project Bin. I'd like to make the sky a little more dramatic. So with the Blue Sky tool, I'll come into the image and with a relatively small brush, I'll click and drag over the sky, and just like that Black And White adjustment tool, this tool selects just part of the image based on its color and tone.

I can add to this selection by clicking here and here and down here. If I mistakenly include a little bit of this flag in this selection, I'll come up to the tool options bar for this tool, again choose Subtract from selection, and I'll come in and subtract that little bit from the selection. When I'm done, I'll choose Select > Deselect. This effect doesn't look too bad on this image, but it does look a little bit artificial on some photos. So let me show you how you can modify the effect.

That's done by bringing the photo into another editing workspace, the full edit workspace. I'll do that by clicking the Full tab in the task pane on the right. Down here is the Layers panel, and in the Layers panel on top of the photo layer there is a new Blue Skies layer that was created with that tool over in the Quick Photo edit workspace. We'll learn a lot more about layers and layer masks in a later chapter, but for now, just make sure that this Blue Sky layer is black, in other words it's selected, and then go up to this Opacity field at the top of the Layers panel.

Move your mouse over the word Opacity and drag to the left, and that will reduce the opacity of the Blue Sky effect on the Blue Skies layer. If you're a little more advanced, you may want to go into this menu, which is the Blend mode menu. The Blue Sky effect uses this Color Burn blend mode, but you can experiment with changing it to other Darken blend modes which are all of the ones in this section of the Blend mode menu. So watch what happens if I choose Multiply instead of Color Burn, I get a different look to this burned in effect.

I am going to go back to the Quick Photo edit workspace by clicking the Quick tab here in the task pane. And I'm going to open another image to show you the other touchup tools. This first image in the Project Bin which I'll double click, notice that the eyes on this girl are a little bit red. This was caused by the on-camera flash. When you have a red glow like this and you want to remove it, the Red Eye Removal tool can sometimes help. I'll select that tool in the toolbar, and then I'll go up to the Options bar and I'll try clicking the Auto button.

Now keep your eye on the girl's eyes and you may have noticed that her right eye looks more normal now, but her left eye still has that red glow. I am going to get the Zoom tool and zoom in so you can see that better. The upshot is that the Red Eye Removal tool doesn't always work perfectly on every image like this. I am going to select that tool again to show you a workaround if this happens to you. Instead of using the Auto button, I'll try to use this tool more manually by moving into the image and clicking directly on the red in the eye.

The result will totally depend on exactly where I click. That did a pretty good job. If I don't like that result I can undo and try again, perhaps darkening the amount of the black, or changing the size of the pupil that gets corrected. But I'll leave that for now. There's another touchup tool in the Quick Photo edit toolbar that you can use to whiten teeth without affecting the rest of the image. I'll select that tool, and then I'll move into the image. I want to make my brush tip relatively small so that I can select just the teeth here.

So I'll press the left bracket key a couple of times on my keyboard, and then I'll click and drag over the teeth. Now if I go a little too far and select the lips by mistake, there is an option for subtracting from the selection up in the tool options bar. I'll click that Subtract from selection option and move down into the image and I'll remove the lips from the selection. The Whiten Teeth tool both selects and desaturates any yellow tinge on teeth all in one step.

So there's nothing more for me to do except for it to deselect by going up to the Select menu and choosing Deselect. That Whiten Teeth tool is a pretty subtle effect so you won't see anything obvious when you look at this image at 100% view as I'll do by selecting the Zoom tool and then clicking 1:1. So if you want to make some specific adjustments that are addressed by these four tools, give the Red Eye Removal tool, the Whiten Teeth tool, the Blue Sky tool or the Black And White touchup tool a try.

Fixing red-eye, improving skies, and touching up photos
Video duration: 6m 29s 11h 4m Beginner

Viewers:

Fixing red-eye, improving skies, and touching up photos provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Jan Kabili as part of the Photoshop Elements 10 Essential Training

Subject:
Photography
Software:
Photoshop Elements
Author:
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