Choosing a Transitional font


show more Choosing a Transitional font provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Laura Franz as part of the Choosing and Using Web Fonts show less
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Choosing a Transitional font

So now that we know what a transitional font looks like, we need to pick one to use. First, let's look at Utopia Standard. It's a transitional font. Look at the lowercase o in Utopia; the stress is almost vertical. That's true in the P as well. You can see the shoulders going into the stem are not a heavy pen stroke; they're thinner, and the weight of the bowl stays on the outside edge. The head serifs are no longer wedge-like, and we can also see that the foot serif on the lowercase d is horizontal.

It no longer looks like an angled pen-formed shape. Also, if we look at the aperture of the lowercase e, it's tighter than we'd see in a humanist font. The bowl is starting to come up and around higher, completing more of the circle, while the closed counter gets a little bit bigger. Yet, when Robert Slimbach designed this font for Adobe in 1989, he combined the transitional elements with some more humanist characteristics. The terminal on the A is not a teardrop, but fe...

Choosing a Transitional font
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Choosing a Transitional font provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Laura Franz as part of the Choosing and Using Web Fonts

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Design Web
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