Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font


show more Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Laura Franz as part of the Choosing and Using Web Fonts show less
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Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font

So now that we know what a transitional sans serif font looks like, we need to pick one to use. Let's start by looking at Arial. Arial is a default Web font. You can see that it has a similar x-height to Verdana, and it has a much smaller, narrower aperture. It has an italic that is oblique. That means that it doesn't have some of the humanist forms we've seen in the italics so far, but it's a good italic. It remains readable, and the same is true of the bold.

The bold has good contrast with the regular weight, but it doesn't fill in too much. A great thing about using Arial is that it works cross-browser. A drawback is that as a default font, it's ubiquitous, and many Web designers are tired of using it. Another drawback is that it only has two weights: regular and bold. Throughout this course, we've found it advantageous to use three or four weights. If you're interested in using a transitional sans serif, that is, a font that looks similar to Arial, but is no...

Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font
Video duration: 5m 14s 6h 52m Appropriate for all

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Choosing a Transitional Sans Serif font provides you with in-depth training on Design. Taught by Laura Franz as part of the Choosing and Using Web Fonts

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Design Web
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