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Rotating elements


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Rotating elements

The ability to rotate geometry is another fundamental skill we need to work effectively in AutoCAD. I am sure you will agree that it's much faster to rotate an object than it is to draw a new object at a different rotation. In this lesson we are going to learn how to use the Rotate command. On my screen I have got a drawing that represents a pseudo clock. Let's start by rotating this hand. The Rotate command is located in the Modify panel of the Ribbon, the icon is right here. Now that I have launched the command, I will select the object I'd like to rotate, and then I will right-click. Now AutoCAD is asking for base point.

The base point is the point I will be rotating my object around. I would like to rotate the hand around the center of this end. Now be careful when you click your object snap, I have a running object snap of Center and end point. So whichever one my cursor is closest to, that's what I am going to get. I am going to click right here to make sure I get Center. At this point I can specify my rotation angle by free picking a point on screen or I can type the angle of my choice. I am going to type 45, and hit Enter. I just rotated that object 45 degrees.

Now here is the trick. When using the Rotate command, a positive angle will rotate around these counterclockwise. If I wanted to rotate this geometry in a clockwise direction, I'd have to use a negative angle. Let's launch the Rotate command again, and this time we will look at one of the sub-options. I am going to select the object I'd like to rotate and right-click. I'd like to rotate it around the center right here, and take a look at the command line. Notice I have a sub-option of Copy. I can create a rotated copy of my geometry. To access the sub-option I will right- click and select Copy from the menu, and for my rotation angle, I am going to type negative 65 and hit Enter.

Notice that my copy was rotated clockwise from the original. Now that we understand how Rotate works, let's try it out in a practical example. I am going to zoom-out, pan my drawing over. On my screen I have got a drawing of a workstation. I have a chair, and a desk, and a computer. The first thing I'd like to do is rotate my chair such that it faces the computer. To do that I will launch the Rotate command, I will select my chair and right-click. Now at what point would I like to rotate the chair around? Well, I don't have a nice object snap and you know what, it's furniture.

So I don't need a high degree of accuracy. So I am just going to click right in the middle of the cushion here, and then I will use a rotation angle of negative 90, because I'd like the chair to rotate clockwise. Let's take this concept even further. Maybe this drawing is for the interior of an office. Maybe I'd like to create a grouping of workstations. I am going to zoom-out a little bit and I will pan this down, then I will re-launch the Rotate command, and I'd like to rotate the entire workstation. So I am going to use a Selection Window.

Rather than picking these objects individually, I am going to click out in the space here, and then I will move down them to the right, and I'll click again to finish my window. That selects everything that fell within the window. I will right-click when I am finished. I will then select the end point right here for my base point, and I'd like to create a copy. So let's right-click to access the sub-options. I will select Copy, and I'd like to rotate my copy 90 degrees, Enter. Let's pan this down a little bit, and we will take it even further. I will launch the Rotate command again.

This time I am going to rotate all of this geometry. I will click right here, I will pull down to the right, and I will click again to finish my Selection Window, and then I will right-click. I'd like to rotate this geometry from the end point right here. I'd like to make a copy. So let's right-click to bring up the sub-options, I will select Copy, and my rotation angle is going to be 180. When using the Rotate command, the most important thing to remember is the significance of your rotation angle. If the angle is a positive number, your entities will rotate counterclockwise. Once you understand this concept, you can easily rotate your entities to match their surroundings.

Rotating elements
Video duration: 3m 48s 6h 48m Beginner

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Rotating elements provides you with in-depth training on CAD. Taught by Jeff Bartels as part of the AutoCAD 2011 Essential Training

Subject:
CAD
Software:
AutoCAD
Author:
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