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Adding annotations


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Adding annotations

When it comes to text creation, the workflow is also identical between the Mac and Windows version of AutoCAD. The Mac version however uses some updated interface tools. In this lesson, we are going to learn how to create some annotations usingy the new interface. On my screen, I have a drawing of a tree planting detail, and I'd like to start by creating a title for this drawing. As long as we are creating a title, let's create a text style as well. To create a style, I am going to open the Format menu and I'll come down and select Style.

This brings up the Text Style dialog box. In this area on the left, I can see all of the styles that are defined in this drawing. Right now, I only have the Standard Style. This arrow represents that the Style is current. I can use these buttons in the lower-left to add or remove a Style. I am going to click Add and I'll call my Style, Title, and I'll press Return. In this column, I can choose a font for my Text Style. You'll find the TrueType fonts to be at the top of this list.

If I drag this all the way to the bottom, this is where we can find the AutoCAD fonts. Let me drag this back up. I am going to leave this set to the default Arial font, but I am going to change the Typeface to Bold. Next, we'll look at the additional settings. These first few buttons are toggles that I can turn on and off. For instance, do I want my Text Style to be annotative? If it is annotative, do I want it to match the viewport rotation? Do I want the text to read upside- down, or backwards, or vertical? If I change these, I can see the change reflected in the preview above.

I can also hardcode a Text height, Width factor, or rotation Angle. I would like my Text Style to be annotative and I'd like it to have a printed text height of 0.2. I'll press Tab to accept that value, then I'll click Apply and Close. To create my text, I am going to switch to the Annotation tool space, and then I'll click-and-hold on the Text tool and I'll select Single Line text. Now, I am getting a warning, AutoCAD is saying, hey, you're creating annotative text but you're placing it at a scale of 1:1, do you want to do this? This is fine because this detail is designed to be plotted at a scale of 1:1.

So, I am going to click OK and at this point, creating the text is just like it is on the Windows version. I am going to click to place the start point, I'll press Return to accept the default rotation angle, and I'll type TREE PLANTING DETAIL. Now, let's create some general notes. For my notes, I am going to create another Text Style. Let's go back up to Format. I'll click Text Style, I am going to click the Add button and I'll call this style General Notes, and I'll press Return.

Once again I am going to go with the Arial font. This time I'll use the Regular Typeface. I'd like this font to be annotative and I'd like it to have a printed text height of 0.1. Once again, I'll press Tab; I'll click Apply and Close. To create my notes, I am going to use Multiline Text. So, I'll move over and launch the Multiline Text command. I will then click two points onscreen to define the width of my column, and notice that the Multiline Text Editor looks different than what we're used to seeing.

The new toolbar on screen is called a visor, and it's just another example of the streamlined approach to our tools. Let's take a look at what we have. Right here, I can change my Text Style. I can also change the text height. I have some text formatting options, Undo and Redo; I can also cancel or save my changes. If I click this arrow down at the end, I can expand the visor or I could access to even more tools. Right here I can change my font. I can change the text color.

Right here I have some paragraph formatting options. I can insert special symbols or fields, or I can launch the Find and Replace command. Now, you probably notice that some of the settings like Bulleted Lists and Columns appear to be missing and you're correct. For right now, let's stick with the tools that we have on screen. We'll finish creating our notes, and then we'll talk about where we can find the additional settings. I am going to click in a Text Editor and I'll start entering my notes. This is going to be a Numbered List.

So, I'll enter my first number and then I'll press Tab and I'll continue. When I am finished with my notes, I'll move up and click Save to close the Editor. First of all, I want you to notice that the workflow for creating multiline text is exactly the same as it is in the Windows version. Secondly, note that the Numbered List worked even though we didn't see settings in the Text Editor. Likewise, if I select this text and grab the script down at the bottom and push up, notice this text also supports columns. I am going to press Escape a couple times to deselect this.

All right, so where do we go to adjust the additional settings? The answer is the right-click menu. I am going to double-click this text to bring back the Editor. Now, if I right-click, this is where I can find the settings for Bulleted Lists, Columns, Background Masks as well as several others. I am going to press Escape to close this menu and then I'll click, hold-and-drag to select my Numbered List. I'll right-click, let's change this to a Lettered list and we'll use Lowercase letters.

When I am finished, I'll click Save to close the Editor. As you can see, creating text using the Mac version of AutoCAD is just as easy and powerful as it is on the Windows version, and the streamlined approach to our tools gives us even more room for our designs.

Adding annotations
Video duration: 5m 55s 2h 45m Beginner

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Adding annotations provides you with in-depth training on CAD. Taught by Jeff Bartels as part of the AutoCAD 2011: Migrating from Windows to Mac

Subject:
CAD
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AutoCAD
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