Using sound leakage to your advantage


show more Using sound leakage to your advantage provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Recording Techniques show less
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Using sound leakage to your advantage

Acoustics spill, or leakage from one instrument into another's mic, is many times thought of as undesirable, but it can and should be used to enhance the sounds instead of avoided. In this video we'll look at decreasing leakage and also using it to our advantage when it's there. Many who are inexperienced at recording are under the mistaken belief that during a tracking session with multiple instruments, every track recorded must contain only the instrument or source that mic was pointed at. That's usually not the case, as most tracks normally have at least some leakage, unless they're totally isolated.

Let's take a listen to the top snare mic from a drum kit. (music playing) Notice how you can hear the other drums in the background of the snare hits, if only faintly. This is perfectly acceptable in most drum recordings. Leakage can be used as a sort of glue between instruments in much the same way that instruments magnify one another in a live situation. If you're in a ...

Using sound leakage to your advantage
Video duration: 1m 36s 5h 17m Beginner

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Using sound leakage to your advantage provides you with in-depth training on Audio + Music. Taught by Bobby Owsinski as part of the Audio Recording Techniques

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Audio + Music
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