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Create Visual Effects With Time-lapse Photography


show more Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Richard Harrington as part of the Creating Time-Lapse Video show less
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Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography

Rich: The final technical decision you need to keep in mind, is how you're going to assemble all of these files. We often refer to this as post processing, and you need to decide if you're going to to do post processing. It's possible with some solutions, such as shooting on an iPad, or an iPhone, or even some cameras to produce a Time-lapse movie right in camera. However, to get the maximum professional quality results, I like to post process. Typically, this means you have to develop the actual image file, so you might use a tool like Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, maybe iPhoto, or Aperture.

Any tool that's compatible with your camera that can open up the images will allow you to process them. However, a very important feature that you're going to want to do, is to have the ability o to batch process. This means you could select multiple images and apply the exact same setting to all of them, so you could properly develop those images and get a consistent look. Once you're done, you're going to need to assemble those files. And this can be done a couple of ways. It's possible to just use a basic application, like QuickTime player even to assemble the frames.

But most people turn to either a video editing tool, like Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premier Pro. Or better yet a composting tool, like Adobe After Effect to make it easier to assemble. We're going to explore the post process at the end of this course, but it's important that you know your destination. Make sure the software you choose will work with the files your camera shoots. And the only way to truly do this, is to actually do a test. So, before you go all the way out into the field, and hike up that mountain, or get up at four in the morning to shoot a sunrise.

Do a real simple Time-lapse back in your office. Put the camera up on your tripod, just let it roll, and do some test shots. Once that's done open those files up into your applications of choice, and make sure the work flow works. Always test your work flow in the safety of your home or office, before you go out into the field. And you'll be much happier with the results.

Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography
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Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography provides you with in-depth training on Photography. Taught by Richard Harrington as part of the Creating Time-Lapse Video

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