How to Create Realistic Lighting with Inverse Square Falloff


show more Creating realistic lighting using inverse square falloff provides you with in-depth training on Video. Taught by Mark Christiansen as part of the After Effects CS5.5 New Features show less
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Creating realistic lighting using inverse square falloff

A more intuitive name for Inverse Square Clamped Light Falloff would just be to call it realistic falloff. Real world light uses the inverse square law in which the light is one-quarter of the intensity at double the distance. The word Clamped is in there to add that this calculation begins at the edge of the radius, so it's clamped to that starting value. Let's take a look. So here is a scene set with Smooth Falloff Lighting from the center and I am just going to change it, just so we can see the difference.

Immediately Inverse Square Clamped Lighting is going to do one thing. It pulled in a little bit, but it disperses more. So instead of falling off linearly from the edge of the radius, now it's using this special law. We have a Radius of about 540. you can see the hotspot there, and what you're getting here is just a more natural light. So you don't get control over where the edge of the falloff is, but you can of course adjust the Radius, which I'll do right h...

Creating realistic lighting using inverse square falloff
Video duration: 5m 23s 1h 42m Intermediate

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Creating realistic lighting using inverse square falloff provides you with in-depth training on Video. Taught by Mark Christiansen as part of the After Effects CS5.5 New Features

Subject:
Video
Software:
After Effects
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