Up and Running with VBA in Access

with Curt Frye
please wait ...
Up and Running with VBA in Access
Video duration: 0s 4h 38m Advanced

Viewers:

Enhance productivity by automating routine tasks and providing custom functionality not built into Access with a few basics in VBA code. Author Curt Frye introduces object-oriented programming and provides database designers with a foundation in the Access object model and the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming language. The course covers automating tasks with macros, working in the Visual Basic Editor, writing functions, adding logic, reading data, controlling forms, and more.

Topics include:
  • Working with macros and managing macro security settings
  • Creating, exporting, and deleting code modules
  • Running a VBA procedure
  • Debugging VBA code
  • Defining variables, constants, and calculations
  • Displaying a calculated result in a message box
  • Repeating tasks with loops
  • Creating conditional statements
  • Manipulating database objects, such as forms, tables, and queries
  • Adding, editing, and deleting records
  • Looking up values in a table
  • Requerying and repainting forms
Subjects:
Business Developer IT
Software:
Access Visual Basic for Applications
Author:

Welcome

Hi! I am Curt Frye. Welcome to Up and Running with VBA in Access. In this course, I will show you how to automate Access databases using macros, to run a macro by clicking a Command button, and to manage macro security settings. I will introduce Visual Basic for Applications, also known as VBA, starting with an overview of object-oriented programming, the Access Object Model, and using the Visual Basic Editor.

The course focuses on adding logic to your VBA code, manipulating database objects, and the controlling forms and reports using the Me object. Whether you use Access in a small business or from home projects, you will discover that VBA programming can make your databases much more useful. In short, I'm sure you'll find that your time with Up and Running with VBA in Access will be time well spent. Let's get going.

There are currently no FAQs about Up and Running with VBA in Access.

please wait ...