Working with the Watch and other debug windows


show more Working with the Watch and other debug windows provides you with in-depth training on Developer. Taught by Walt Ritscher as part of the Visual Studio 2010 Essential Training show less
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Working with the Watch and other debug windows

In this example, I will look at the watch, locals, call stack, and thread windows inside Visual Studio. I'm inside a project called UsingWatchWindows. This is a WPF application, and I have a little sample UI down here in MainWindow.xaml. Let's take a look at it. There are six buttons in here, and each of these buttons allows me to show you one of the windows inside Visual Studio. And before I show you the actual windows, I need to build my application, and then I am going to attach the Debugger by clicking the Debug > Start Debugging.

Then I am going to click on this Watch Windows button. Notice that I have this code in here that causes the debugger to stop automatically if a debugger is attached. I talked about that in the previous movie. I am going to press F10 to step through a few lines of code. The idea behind the watch window is that it's a permanent repository for data that you want to look at. So if I want to keep this s1 around, instead of having to hover over this to s...

Working with the Watch and other debug windows
Video duration: 7m 46s 8h 9m Intermediate

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Working with the Watch and other debug windows provides you with in-depth training on Developer. Taught by Walt Ritscher as part of the Visual Studio 2010 Essential Training

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