Setting exposure for studio lighting


show more Setting exposure for studio lighting provides you with in-depth training on 3D + Animation. Taught by Aaron F. Ross as part of the Creating Product Shots in 3ds Max show less
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Setting exposure for studio lighting

With our lights placed, we need to adjust the exposure to bring the brightness values of the rendering into a usable range. Let's take a look at it once again, I'll click render production. And here it is with just the default exposure values. To adjust this, we'll want to go into the Rendering menu and choose Exposure Control, which opens up the Environment and Effects dialog. And you'll see in the Exposure Control section that mr Photographic Exposure Control is currently enabled. Scroll down a little bit. And the most significant parameter here is Exposure Value, and that's essentially how much light is allowed into the camera.

If we increase this value, that corresponds to stopping down the camera, or letting in less light. I'll set the exposure value to 9. Okay, and we'll do another test render, see what it looks like now. As you can see, with a higher exposure value, the rendering is much darker. The rim lighting, or back lighting from the photometric lights here look...

Setting exposure for studio lighting
Video duration: 3m 9s 3h 25m Intermediate

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Setting exposure for studio lighting provides you with in-depth training on 3D + Animation. Taught by Aaron F. Ross as part of the Creating Product Shots in 3ds Max

Subjects:
3D + Animation CAD
Software:
3ds Max
Author:
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