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iMovie 11 Essential Training
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Organizing events


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iMovie 11 Essential Training

with Garrick Chow

Video: Organizing events

This chapter is all about getting your clips organized in iMovie. Sure, we could jump right in and start editing, but believe me, you definitely want to spend some time going through your clips and doing things like organizing them into events, rating them, and adding keywords. It'll make your life much easier as your library of clips continues to grow. So let's start by taking a look at how to further organize our events. As we've already seen, whenever you import clips iMovie always asks you whether you want to add the clips to an existing event or into a new event. So you have to place clips into events no matter what, but that doesn't mean the clips have to stay in those events.
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  1. 1m 44s
    1. Welcome
      45s
    2. Using the exercise files
      59s
  2. 1m 6s
    1. Making sure you have the latest version of iMovie
      1m 6s
  3. 19m 13s
    1. Types of connections
      1m 58s
    2. Importing from a tape-based camera
      5m 40s
    3. Importing from a memory-based camera
      4m 8s
    4. Importing from a digital still camera
      3m 31s
    5. Importing from other sources
      2m 24s
    6. Capturing live action
      1m 32s
  4. 11m 55s
    1. Interface overview
      2m 8s
    2. The Event Library and Event Browser
      4m 9s
    3. Selecting and adding clips to a project
      3m 3s
    4. The toolbar
      2m 35s
  5. 23m 53s
    1. Organizing events
      4m 28s
    2. Rating clips
      3m 26s
    3. Advanced rating tools
      2m 34s
    4. Tagging with keywords
      5m 6s
    5. Automatically finding people in your clips
      2m 15s
    6. Moving events to a different hard drive
      2m 15s
    7. Deleting unwanted clips from your hard drive
      3m 49s
  6. 26m 40s
    1. Creating a new project
      2m 36s
    2. Adding clips to the project
      5m 46s
    3. Trimming and slip edits
      3m 40s
    4. Fine-tuning clips
      2m 6s
    5. Splitting clips
      3m 0s
    6. Cropping and rotating
      5m 11s
    7. The advanced Edit tool
      2m 14s
    8. Using a traditional timeline
      2m 7s
  7. 51m 55s
    1. Creating and adjusting still clips
      3m 22s
    2. Incorporating photos
      5m 48s
    3. Adjusting color
      5m 51s
    4. Using transitions
      9m 5s
    5. Adding titles
      4m 1s
    6. Using one-step effects
      2m 14s
    7. Stabilizing video
      5m 7s
    8. Using green screen effects
      7m 0s
    9. Creating movie trailers
      9m 27s
  8. 36m 21s
    1. Adjusting audio levels and position
      6m 8s
    2. Adding music and sound effects
      7m 15s
    3. Adding background music
      6m 48s
    4. Adding a voiceover
      5m 4s
    5. Extracting audio from other clips
      2m 58s
    6. Editing to the beat
      8m 8s
  9. 35m 11s
    1. Exporting to iTunes
      4m 58s
    2. Exporting to the Media Browser
      3m 37s
    3. Sharing to iDVD
      51s
    4. Publishing to a MobileMe web gallery
      4m 26s
    5. Publishing to YouTube, Vimeo, and iReport
      4m 39s
    6. Publishing to Facebook
      2m 49s
    7. Exporting QuickTime movies
      2m 29s
    8. Exporting a project for Final Cut
      2m 26s
    9. Changing published projects
      57s
    10. Finalizing your project
      2m 5s
    11. Moving a project to another Mac
      5m 54s
  10. 41s
    1. Goodbye
      41s

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iMovie 11 Essential Training
3h 28m Beginner Feb 03, 2011

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In iMovie 11 Essential Training, author Garrick Chow illustrates the process of creating high-quality video using iMovie 11. The course covers the entire post-production process, from importing audio, video, and still images to adding effects, creating trailers, and sharing your finished projects on social networks. Also included are tutorials on adjusting audio levels, automatically identifying clips that include faces, and using green screen effects. Exercise files accompany the course.

Topics include:
  • Importing footage and stills
  • Organizing and locating clips using ratings and keyword tags
  • Cropping, trimming, splitting, and fine-tuning clips
  • Inserting transitions between clips
  • Applying One-Step effects
  • Stabilizing shaky footage
  • Adding background music and voiceovers
  • Synchronizing footage to specific points of an audio track
  • Publishing content to YouTube, Vimeo, and Facebook
  • Exporting movies and projects
Subjects:
Video Video Editing Computer Skills (Mac)
Software:
iMovie
Author:
Garrick Chow

Organizing events

This chapter is all about getting your clips organized in iMovie. Sure, we could jump right in and start editing, but believe me, you definitely want to spend some time going through your clips and doing things like organizing them into events, rating them, and adding keywords. It'll make your life much easier as your library of clips continues to grow. So let's start by taking a look at how to further organize our events. As we've already seen, whenever you import clips iMovie always asks you whether you want to add the clips to an existing event or into a new event. So you have to place clips into events no matter what, but that doesn't mean the clips have to stay in those events.

You can split events up, merge them together, or completely get rid of them and the clips they contain. For example, my surfing event actually consists of twelve clips. If I drag the slider all the way to the right, you can see the individual clips a little bit better. Now there are two clips in here that are more shots of scenery than actual surfing, which are this one and this one. So let's say I want to have these clips in their own event. Just click anywhere inside the clip that you want to turn into its own event, then choose File > Split Event Before Clip. You can also right-click and select the same command from the right-click menu.

So notice now we have Surfing Clips 1 and Surfing Clips. I'm going to rename Surfing Clips 1 by double- clicking it, and I'll call this one Ocean Shots. So that's how easy it is to split footage into separate events. This is especially useful if you've imported footage from two completely different events, like your cousin's wedding and your vacation in the Swiss Alps. But also be aware that if you have more than two clips in an event, all the clips after the one you split from will be added to the new event.

For example, now that I look at this third clip, this is actually a surfing shot, so it belongs in this surfing event. Not really a problem. I'll just click anywhere in the clip, then I'll press Command A for select all to select the entire clip, and then I'll drag that into my Surfing Clips event. I'll confirm that I do want to move it, and just like that, it's gone from the Ocean Shots event, and it's now in the Surfing Clips event. But you really don't want to go too crazy with splitting up events. If two or more events really are related to each other, it's probably better to keep them as a single event or merge them back together if you've already split them.

Because events can start to add up, you can save yourself some space in your listed events by merging related events together. To do so, you simply drag one event on top of the other. So I can merge my two surfing events back together by grabbing say Ocean Shots and dragging that on top of Surfing Clips. So iMovie knows I want to merge the events together, and I'm going to keep the Surfing Clips name in this case, and now everything is back in the Surfing Clips event. Now when it comes to viewing the events in your Event Library, you have a couple of choices as to how they are displayed in here.

You'll find most of your choices under the View menu. You can see I have Most Recent Events at Top currently selected, which means all of my most recent events are at the top of my Event Library. You can also turn on Group Events By Disk. Remember, you can choose where you want to import your events into, and if you have an external hard drive, you can show your drives by selecting this option. So you can see right now on Macintosh hard drive. Those are those events. But I also have Drive A and Drive B. I also have an un-mounted network drive named Melanie, which is my co-worker's computer in here, which I'm not going to access from here.

But this view lets you see your events by drive. Alternately, you can toggle this view on and off using the drive button in the upper right-hand corner of the Event Library. Now, I'll just leave that off. Under the View menu, you can also view events by month, which can be really useful if you shoot a lot of video. This way you can quickly narrow down your search for footage by glancing at the month each event took place in. And the other choice here is to show separate days in events, and that can be useful if you, say, took a week long vacation and you want to be able to view the clips from each day.

Pretty much all of my clips were shot on the same day though, so we're not seeing any of the separation here. You might also find it useful to go to iMovie > Preferences, and under the Browser tab, you can choose Show date ranges in Event Library, so now you can see the date ranges under each event. So for instance if my surfing clips were shot between November 10th and November 15th, you would see November 10th 2010-November 15th 2010. I'm just going to turn that off.

Okay, so those are some of our options for organizing and viewing our events. I'm just going to make sure everything is set back to the default settings for now. You, of course, can have this set up any way you like. And in the next movie, we'll take a look at how to rate your clips.

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