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By Ashley Kennedy | Sunday, October 12, 2014

Filmmaking Under Fire: Making Movies in Syria with lynda.com

2014_10_13_SyrianFilm

Film editor Danniel Daoud was screening a cut for his director recently when missiles began striking less than 2 kilometers away. Danniel turned up the volume of his speakers to drown out the incredible blasts.

“I moved the audio sliders up so the directors wouldn’t hear the sounds—so they are not scared,” said Danniel*. “I tell them it is more safe inside than in the streets. This is what parents do for their children, as well.”

Danniel lives in Syria—a country currently entrenched in international crisis and civil war. Not only must he live among threats of physical violence, but as a creative professional, he must also deal with stifling restrictions imposed upon his country by other countries because of Syria’s complex ties to war and terrorism.

By Ashley Kennedy | Wednesday, October 01, 2014

New Post-Production Series Kicks Off with Master Clip Effects

2014_10_01_VPTWmasterclip

This week kicks off my new Video Post Tips Weekly training series, covering all-things-post-production.

Each Wednesday, I’ll teach a specific technique or workflow—but I’ll be covering it in multiple nonlinear editing (NLE) platforms like Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro X, and Avid Media Composer. This is a great opportunity for you to just watch the movie(s) applicable to your preferred NLE—or you can watch each movie and start to build a vocabulary for how other NLEs tackle similar operations.

It’s my goal to make the series a cross-pollination of editing tips that familiarizes editors with a wide variety of techniques and software.

This week’s topic, master clip effects, explores a really exciting development in editing that allows you to correct or stylize your clips right at the master clip level—rather than applying effects to individual clips in your Timeline. Specifically, we’ll be looking at how to do this in Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro X.

By Ashley Kennedy | Friday, September 12, 2014

Hollywood Gender Divide: Women in Post-Production Speak Out

Scene from the 1913 film

Scene from the 1913 film “The Evidence of the Film”

In the very early days of film, nearly all editing positions were held by women. Female editors, or “cutters” as they were called, were known as the stitchers and menders of the craft. The work was all done by hand; it was low-paid and women rarely received screen credits for their work.

Fast forward to a century later, and although advancing film technologies have made the work easier and more efficient, the proportion of women editing motion pictures has gone from a majority to a low minority—extending the Hollywood gender divide to yet another area of motion picture-making.

By Seán Duggan | Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Using Layer Masks with Video in Photoshop

video_layermasks_07

Photoshop has been able to handle video for several versions now, but the video features got a big upgrade with the CS6 release—in the form of a Timeline panel. This was significant because the timeline interface has long been a fixture in other dedicated video editing programs.

The nice thing about working with video in Photoshop is that you can rely on all the skills and techniques you already know about working with layers, adjustment layers, and layer masks. The ability to use layer masks with video layers allows you to create some really interesting custom transitions and composites for your video projects.

By Robbie Carman | Friday, February 07, 2014

Process multi-camera shots with Final Cut Pro X: DSLR Video Tips

Episode 79- 01

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

Last week Rich and I explored a multi-camera workflow process in Adobe Premiere Pro CC. This week, we’ll take a look at the same workflow using Apple’s nonlinear editing software Final Cut Pro X. We’ll dive into the Final Cut Pro X workspace and show you various processing methods for multi-camera footage and the basics of multi-camera editing.

This week you’ll learn how to

• Post-process multi-camera footage in Final Cut Pro X • Organize multi-camera shots in Final Cut Pro X • Synchronize audio from multi-camera shots using click tracks • Edit multi-camera footage in Final Cut Pro X

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Color correcting and adding a soundtrack to GoPro video: Deke's Techniques

Correcting and adding a soundtrack to GoPro videos

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

The quadcopter crashes continue in this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques. Join Deke as he shows you how to navigate the Timeline panel, and improve the contrast, vibrancy, and color balance of your footage with adjustment layers. (They’re not just for static imagery!) Then learn how to import an audio track, manipulate its position on the timeline, and adjust the volume of your clip. Along the way, Deke shares some invaluable time-saving shortcuts. Watch the video below to get started.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Edit a GoPro video in Photoshop: Deke's Techniques

Editing GoPro videos in Photoshop

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

This is week two of the Deke’s Techniques aerial imagery challenge. Today, Deke going to show you how to add transitions to the footage we saw compiled in the last episode, with the video editing tools in Photoshop. The video starts with a dramatic liftoff and ends with a crash, but since it was shot with a GoPro camera and remote control quadcopter, no one gets hurt.

Learn how to open the video in the Timeline panel, move clips around the timeline, split clips in multiple places, and add strategic crossfades. Plus, Deke gives you a ton of shortcuts for navigating around the timeline.

By Chris Meyer | Friday, August 23, 2013

Editing and Animating to Sound

Editing and Animating to Sound in After Effects

Although I’m primarily known as an Adobe After Effects user and motion graphics artist, my background is in the music industry. Over the years I’ve found a sympathy for sound to be a big benefit to video professionals: timing animations to your project’s sound increases the impact of your visuals. Inversely, strictly focusing on the visual elements of your edits without serving the sound can distract the viewer, and dilute the overall impact.

I’ve recently distilled years of experience creating visuals to sound into a two-and-a-half-hour video course of exercises and real-world examples, Editing and Animating to Sound in Adobe After Effects. I start with the basics of learning how to “read” an audio waveform to spot the timing of beats in music, and then cut video, build animations, and even drive effects using the audio in your project. I also include a list of “magic tempos” you can hand to musicians so they can create a soundtrack at a speed that makes editing and animating easier.

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