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By Robbie Carman | Saturday, September 27, 2014

Production Tips: Using Small Lights on Your Video Set

Small lights & other gear for video shoots

Sometimes you need a light that can be placed in a small space—where a traditional light can’t go.

Small lights can be tucked away to fill in the shadows and add accent colors on set. They can also be attached to a camera’s hot shoe to add some fill light.

This week on Video Gear Weekly, Rich and guest host James Ball explain the benefits of having small lights in your kit.

By Jeff Carlson | Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Make a Stop Motion Movie on Your iPhone or iPad. It's Easy!

Stop-Motion Bard f5

Stop motion animation was key to many of the first special effects in movies. Jason and the Argonauts wouldn’t be as memorable without Ray Harryhausen’s creatures, and who could forget the original King Kong or even fully animated movies like The Nightmare Before Christmas?

What most appeals to me about stop motion, however, is that you don’t need a Hollywood budget or expensive equipment to do it. You can make your own stop motion movie using an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.

And patience—you’ll need a lot of patience.

Bonus: It’s a great activity for kids on rainy afternoons or long airplane rides!

By Richard Harrington | Friday, September 19, 2014

Choosing a Pair of Professional Headphones

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Headphones are a must-have piece of equipment on set, on stage, and in the studio. They come in different shapes and sizes for a variety of uses.

In this week’s Video Gear Weekly episode, Robbie and guest host Cheryl Ottenritter walk you through the different types of headphones and when it’s best to use them.

By Robbie Carman | Saturday, September 13, 2014

Using a Parabolic Slider in Your Video Shoot

2014_09_12_VGWslider

A slider creates dynamic movement in a video shot. But what if you want a slider shot—and there aren’t enough hands to operate it?

Redrock Micro has a parabolic slider called The One Man Crew that runs on its own and keeps the shot in focus. In this week’s episode of Video Gear Weekly, Rich and I demonstrate how to set up and use a parabolic slider.

By Eduardo Angel | Saturday, September 13, 2014

Dolly Shots 101: Tracking Your Subject

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Nowadays dolly shots can be found in nearly every film, from indie low-budget productions to high-end Hollywood blockbusters. Technically speaking, the dolly setup is simple, consisting of a mobile platform, a construction upon which the platform glides, and the camera. You can achieve this camera movement with a dolly on tracks, a dolly on wheels, or—for faster, easier setups—a slider (see the latest Video Gear Weekly episode for more tips on sliders). Dolly shots are also often referred to as tracking or trucking shots.

By Ashley Kennedy | Friday, September 12, 2014

Hollywood Gender Divide: Women in Post-Production Speak Out

Scene from the 1913 film

Scene from the 1913 film “The Evidence of the Film”

In the very early days of film, nearly all editing positions were held by women. Female editors, or “cutters” as they were called, were known as the stitchers and menders of the craft. The work was all done by hand; it was low-paid and women rarely received screen credits for their work.

Fast forward to a century later, and although advancing film technologies have made the work easier and more efficient, the proportion of women editing motion pictures has gone from a majority to a low minority—extending the Hollywood gender divide to yet another area of motion picture-making.

By Richard Harrington | Saturday, September 06, 2014

Shooting Video with the DJI Phantom 2 Vision Quadcopter

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Now you can get your shot from the sky without having to buy a separate camera. The Phantom 2 Vision lets you capture your overhead shot with its built-in camera.

In this week’s episode of Video Gear Weekly, my guest host Francis Torres and I will show you how the DJI Phantom 2 Vision camera works.

By Eduardo Angel | Friday, September 05, 2014

Shake It Up? When to Use a Handheld Camera

2014_09_06_HandheldCamerasjpg

Camera movement is a powerful tool in filmmaking. It can infuse a scene with drama, track a characters’ movements, direct the viewer’s attention, reveal key details in a scene, and transition between shots in a sequence.

There are essentially six types of camera motion techniques: tilts, pans, dollies, trucks, pedestals, and arcs—and you can accomplish all of these with a handheld camera.

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