Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Terry Lee Stone | Thursday, October 16, 2014

Designers: 4 Questions to Answer When Working with Clients

Working with clients: Get to know them first

Developing a strong working relationship with your clients means really getting to know them.

In most cases, design is just one of many pieces of a larger puzzle your client needs to solve. Try to understand your project’s place in the larger picture and how it fits into your client’s larger business goals.

The best relationship to establish with your primary client contact is as trusted collaborator—and that means getting to know what makes them tick.

Be sure you can answer these four questions before you begin working with clients:

By Terry Lee Stone | Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Designers: Essential Tips for Presenting to Clients

presenting creative work to clients

When you develop creative solutions for a client, you’re generating answers to whatever problem was described in the creative brief. When you’ve reached a point at which client feedback or approval is required, it’s time to present the work to your client and see if you’ve hit the mark.

As most experienced creative folks will confirm, even the most brilliant work won’t really “speak for itself”—not entirely, at least.

When you’re presenting to clients, how you show your creative work might just be as important as the work itself.

By Terry Lee Stone | Tuesday, September 09, 2014

3 MORE Truths About Freelancing

2014_09_09_Freelance2

At some point, most creative people do a little freelancing. Even if you have another job, freelancing is a great way to hone your talents further and make some extra money. I recently shared my 3 Truths About Freelancing—but the story doesn’t end there.

Here are three more important lessons I’ve learned as a freelancer:

By Terry Lee Stone | Tuesday, August 26, 2014

3 Truths About Freelancing

2014_08_26_Freelance

After years of working as an employee for several design firms, I came to freelancing later in my career—and found that I needed to acquire a few new skills.

Here are some things I’ve learned as a freelancer:

By Kristin Ellison | Thursday, August 29, 2013

Save time and money by managing project “scope creep”

Everyone dreads “scope creep.” That’s when a project keeps expanding, either due to endless revisions or the addition of new work that wasn’t part of the original plan. To avoid it, be up front with clients about the number of changes covered in the fees that you’ve agreed upon. Additional work and/or revisions can certainly be accommodated, but you’ll need to amend the original agreement so that you’re fairly compensated for it.

What qualifies as a revision? What’s the difference between minor changes and substantial ones? You’ll have to define the line between the two, and make it clear to your client before you begin work; add this definition into the Terms & Conditions section of your agreement.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.