New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way.

Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By David Niles White | Saturday, February 04, 2012

2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival womens’ panel

As the presenting sponsor of the 27th annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival, lynda.com is once again pleased to open the door to four entertainment-industry panels that feature some of Hollywood’s top talent from the world of producers, directors, and screenwriters. Panelist are carefully chosen during the awards season and include many you’ll see on the Golden Globes®, Emmys®, and Oscars®.

Moderated by Madelyn Hammond from Madelyn Hammond & Associates, the Creative Forces: Women in the Business panel features five female filmmakers whose talents range from animation to independent films. Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Picture Paris) talks about her short film written by husband/writer Brad Hall and her journey to the other side of the camera as producer. Dede Gardner tells us why Fox Searchlight chose not to include images of star Brad Pitt while promoting Tree of Life. Mellisa Cobb (Kung Fu Panda 2) talks about the organic process of producing an animated feature that allows an ongoing evolution of the story during production. Denise Ream (Cars 2) shares her journey in feature animation though the creative juggernaught that is Pixar Animation. And Leslie Urdang (Beginners) talks about the experiences of working with legendary actor Christopher Plummer who was presented with the Modern Master award at this year’s festival.

For more information about the 2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival visit Sbiff.org.

Leslie Urdang (producer, Beginners) speaks about distribution opportunities for indy films.

Denise Ream (Producer, Cars 2) talks about collaborating with John Lassiter and 40 car companies.

Dede Gardner (producer, Tree of Life) on promoting the movie without using Brad Pitt’s face.

Interested in more? • All of the 2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival women’s panel coverage on lynda.com • All lynda.com documentaries

Suggested courses to watch next:2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing2011 SBIFF Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers2011 SBIFF Writer’s Panel: It Starts with the Script2011 SBIFF Women’s Panel: Creative Forces: Women in the Business

By David Niles White | Saturday, February 04, 2012

2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival screenwriters’ panel

As the presenting sponsor of the 27th annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival, lynda.com is once again pleased to open the door to four entertainment industry panels that feature some of Hollywood’s top talent from the world of producers, directors, and screenwriters. Panelist are carefully chosen during the awards season and include many you’ll see at the Golden Globes®, Emmys®, and Oscars®.

Moderated by Anne Thompson from indieWIRE, the It Starts with the Script panelists talk about the development of their films, their research before sitting down at the keyboard, the evolution of the script, and finally, getting it to the screen. What’s clear is that there’s no formula, no easy path, and no shortcuts. The writers candidly reveal the obstacles each overcame on the way to seeing their vision realized and discuss how “write what you know” ultimately became their life’s mantra while they worked on their screenplays. The anecdotes range from stories of inspiring life experience, to the process of transforming a book into a film. Panelists include Mike Mills (Beginners), Will Riser (50/50), Jim Rash (The Decedents), Tate Taylor (The Help), and J.C. Handler (Margin Call).

For more information on the 2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival screenwriters’ panel visit Sbiff.org

Will Riser (writer, 50/50) shares the common elements of his life story and the film.

Tate Taylor (writer, The Help) tells how he responded to the studios once they discover he owned the screen rights to The Help.

Mike Mills (writer, Beginners) wrestles with moving between past and present day in the script.

Interested in more? • All of the 2012 Santa Barbara International Film Festival screenwriters’ panel coverage on lynda.com • All lynda.com documentaries

Suggested courses to watch next:2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing2011 SBIFF Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers2011 SBIFF Writer’s Panel: It Starts with the Script2011 SBIFF Women’s Panel: Creative Forces: Women in the Business

By David Niles White | Wednesday, February 16, 2011

lynda.com documentary team answers questions from SBIFF audience

Our last post from this year’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival shows you five of the many faces behind our flagship documentary series, Creative Inspirations. We were honored to have two of our documentaries, Doyald Young, Logotype Designer and Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist chosen as official selections to be screened at the festival.

At the request of the festival, director Scott Erickson and I made ourselves available for questions and answers from the audience. For our premiere evening, we were we joined by editor Tracy Clarke, editor/cinematographer Mia Shimabuku, and co-founder Lynda Weinman. Here’s a rare opportunity to see our team in front of the camera… and to see me wearing a sport jacket.

By David Niles White | Thursday, February 10, 2011

2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing

The last, and arguably most important panel of the festival’s second weekend, was the 2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing. I don’t know if it was because I arrived early or because I work with lynda.com, but I found myself sitting in the front row. Quite a view.

Moderator Peter Bart from Variety started out with an observation that unlike in previous years, most all of this year’s Oscar nominated films were low budget films, except Pixar’s Toy Story 3, which costs $200 million. Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan was among the highest budgets at a relatively paltry $13 million. Debra Granik’s Winter’s Bone was a slim $2 million and even David O. Russell’s The Fighter weighed in at only $11 million. The directors described how not having money to throw at problems required innovative creative storytelling techniques and in many ways, made the films better.

Since this troupe of directors have been tied together doing the Oscar circuit of award ceremonies and interviews, they talked about how this effects their work and the camaraderie they’ve developed. Their overwhelming desire was to get back to work as soon as possible. In the meantime, they joked about acceptance speeches, not sounding glib, and thanking the people most important to them.

This panel includes: Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan Charles Ferguson – Inside Job Debra Granik – Winter’s Bone Tom Hooper – The King’s Speech David O. Russell – The Fighter Lee Unkrick – Toy Story 3

By David Niles White | Tuesday, February 08, 2011

2011 SBIFF Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers

A great weekend of panels culminated with the 2011 SBIFF  Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers.

For obvious reasons, I always feel at one with this panel. Whether the budget is small or large, producers share similar concerns. Whether you’re only shooting for 24 days (Blue Valentine) or as many as 90 (The Social Network), the producers job is the same–we’re here to preserve the director’s vision of our projects and pick the right times to help or stay out of the way. Such is the case with the Academy Award nominated group of films featured in this discussion.

I found particularly fascinating the MPAA ratings battles that continue to rage amongst the filmmakers. The King’s Speech, searching for a broader audience, is seeking a PG-13 rating, though can’t get it because of one scene (you’ll have to see it to know which one). And Blue Valentine fought off an NC-17 rating, winning an appeal to the board with a unanimous vote to overturn.

There was also a lively discussion about making films based on real people and real events as is the case with The Fighter, The Social Network, and The King’s Speech.

This panel includes: Darla K. Anderson – Toy Story 3 Iain Canning – The King’s Speech Alix Madigan – Winter’s Bone Todd Lieberman – The Fighter Mike Deluca – The Social Network Jamie Patricof – Blue Valentine

By Crystal McCullough | Monday, February 07, 2011

SBMS Teen Press interviews Lynda and Bruce

The Santa Barbara Middle School (SBMS) Teen Press visited our offices, and did a great job interviewing Lynda and Bruce recently about what inspires them, why they sponsor the festival, their history, and more. Watch the entire series:

P.S. If you don’t get the See’s Candy reference, watch The logo story.

By David Niles White | Friday, February 04, 2011

The 2011 SBIFF Women’s Panel now available in the Online Training Library®

A great weekend of panels continued with the SBIFF Women’s Panel, Creative Forces: Women in the Business. The panel is now available for all to watch in the Online Training Library®.

This was a very diverse group of women from many areas of filmmaking, including animation, visual effects, costume design, documentary and dramatic film. All are top industry award winners and nominees.

Toy Story 3 producer Darla K. Anderson shared some insights into the four year production cycle at Pixar. The producer of Waiting for Superman, Leslie Chilott, shares how documentary filmmaking can be a powerful tool for social change. And the visual effects producer from world class facility Digital Domain, Gloria Borders, talks about how to get started learning new technologies.

This panel includes: Darla K. Anderson – Producer, Toy Story 3 Colleen Atwood – Costumer Designer, Alice in Wonderland Gloria Borders – Executive Visual Effects Producer at Digital Domain (Tron: Legacy) Leslie Chilcott – Producer, Waiting for Superman Alix Madigan – Producer, Winter’s Bone

By David Niles White | Wednesday, February 02, 2011

2011 SBIFF Writer’s Panel: It Starts with the Script now available in the Online Training Library®

writers' panel

The writer's panel at the Santa Barbara International film festival featured (from left to right) moderator Anne Thompson (indieWIRE), Michael Arndt (Toy Story 3), Lisa Cholodenko (The Kids Are All Right), Charlie Mitchell (Get Low), David Seidler (The King’s Speech), Scott Silver (The Fighter), Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network)

My favorite part of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival has to be the industry panels. Over the weekend, I watched the writer’s panel. As a member of the Producer’s Guild, I’m fortunate to have screened most all of the Academy Award nominated films, and right there in front of me were the nominated writers!

The panel was a lighthearted and candid look at how these writers’ scripts have found their way from the keyboard to the big screen. What’s clear is that there’s no formula, no easy path, and no shortcuts. The writers reveal the obstacles each overcame on the way to seeing their vision realized. The anecdotes range from stories of triumph over adversity to remarkable collaborative efforts to just plain luck.

Here’s a small taste: David Seidler, writer for The King’s Speech, requested permission from the Queen Mother to tell King George’s story. She gave her permission with the proviso that it only be produced after her death since it would be too painful to re-live on the screen. She died just short of age 102, nearly 25 years after he made his request.

This year’s panel, moderated by Anne Thompson of indieWIRE, features these screenwriters: Aaron Sorkin – The Social Network Scott Silver – The Fighter David Seidler – The King’s Speech Charlie Mitchell – Get Low Lisa Cholodenko – The Kids Are All Right Michael Arndt – Toy Story 3

How did Michael Arndt come up with Spanish Buzz Lightyear for Toy Story 3? Does Aaron Sorkin have a Facebook account? Find out by watching 2011 SBIFF Writer’s Panel: It Starts with the Script. All movies in this course are availble to watch for non-members, as well as members.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.