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By Jim Heid | Wednesday, February 22, 2012

The techniques and community of iPhone photography

Perhaps you’ve heard the saying “the best camera is the one that’s with you.”

For millions of people, that camera is an Apple iPhone. The iPhone’s popularity has led to a flood of photography-related apps and a thriving community of iPhone photographers who meet up in person and share photos using the wildly popular Instagram site.

The iPhone’s popularity as a camera has also led to our first course devoted to “iPhoneography.” The course, callediPhone Photography, from Shooting to Storytelling, is taught by Richard Koci Hernandez and is our latest photography course.

When we set out to do a course on iPhone photography, it was obvious that we needed to cover shooting tips and cool photo apps, but we also wanted to celebrate the iPhone photography community. We wanted to show the fun and mutual inspiration that comes from sharing visual stories with other people. We wanted to capture the spirit of communal creativity that happens when photographers get together and interact.

Our opportunity came last October, when the world’s first iPhone photography conference took place in San Francisco. We attended the conference and shot video of the sessions and then enjoyed shooting a morning photo walk through San Francisco’s Mission District. We even used the iPhone 4S to shoot some of the photo walk video.

iPhonography photo through an iPhone 4S

Shooting with Richard Koci Hernandez during the 1197 Conference photo walk. Photo Credit: Jim Heid

After the conference, we hit the road with author and multimedia photojournalist Richard Koci Hernandez. We tagged along as he went shooting on the streets of Los Angeles, and then we returned to the studio, where he shared tips for his favorite photography apps as well as insights on the art of visual storytelling.

We think the course reflects the creative excitement surrounding the world of iPhone photography. It was a fun course to work on, and we hope you’ll find it a fun course to watch.

(And if you’d like to hear more from Richard Koci Hernandez, don’t miss the Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist Creative Inspirations documentary we did about him last year.)

Interested in more? • The full iPhone Photography, from Shooting to Storytellingcourse • All Photography courses on lynda.com • All courses from Richard Koci Hernandez on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:iPad Tips and TricksiPhone and iPod touch iOS 5 Essential TrainingRichard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia JournalistOrganizing and Archiving Digital PhotosCreating Photo Books with Blurb

By Jim Heid | Monday, October 31, 2011

Scene on the Street: Focus on street photography

Street photography captures people at their most unguarded. There’s no posing, no preparation, and no encouragement involving the word “cheese.” Just point and shoot—often without even breaking stride.

Street photography is an honorable photographic genre that counts among its practitioners such legends as Henri Cartier-Bresson and Pedro Meyer. It’s a genre I’ve experimented with when traveling precisely because of its candid quality: If part of what makes a place is its people, then capturing unposed photos of those people is a critical part of documenting the essence of a place.

In Le Marais, Paris. Photo: Jim Heid

But street photography is also potentially controversial, and we’ve noticed a lot of blog and Twitter chatter about it lately. Part of the controversy deals with privacy: does a photographer have a legal right to photograph someone without his or her permission? The general guideline, at least in the United States, is yes, provided that the subject is in a public place where there isn’t an expectation of privacy, such as a sidewalk, a park, or a street.

Another part of the controversy deals with what I’ll charitably call bad manners. Some street photographers employ a paparazzi shooting style that involves putting their cameras uncomfortably close to a stranger’s face—sometimes even hiding around corners or behind phone booths before doing so.

Besides being rude, this style of street photography destroys exactly what the genre does best: capturing people at a moment when being photographed is the last thing on their minds. Look at some paparazzi-style street shots, and you’ll see photos of people who are startled, annoyed, or hamming it up for the camera. In all three cases, the candid, unguarded moment is lost.

The blog SnapSort recently published a post showing examples of how and how not to do street shooting. The lynda.com Creative Inspirations documentary about Richard Koci Hernandez also discusses the subject. Here’s an excerpt.

Since we shot that documentary, Koci has embraced Apple’s iPhone as a tool for street photography. A couple of weeks ago, he led photo walks through San Francisco and discussed iPhone photography at the 1197 conference in San Francisco. As one of the sponsors of the event, lynda.com was there shooting video for an iPhone photography course.

By David Niles White | Friday, September 09, 2011

Creative Inspirations bonus feature: Richard Koci Hernandez

This spring, lynda.com had a special screening of Richard Koci Hernandez: Multimedia Journalist at the Pacific Film Archive Theatre on the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. Since we filmed this documentary, Koci has been granted a full time teaching position in the Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. After the screening, Koci was interviewed by Jeremy Rue, a colleague in the graduate school, to talk about the film, his career, and to answer questions that have been posed to us since the film’s release. Many photographers had asked about the need to secure releases from his subjects when shooting his unique style of street photography. This answer and an update on Koci’s current projects are here as part of the Creative Inspirations bonus features.

By David Niles White | Sunday, April 17, 2011

Free Creative Inspirations screening Tuesday at UC Berkeley: Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist

On Tuesday, April 19th, we’ll be screening Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist on campus at UC Berkeley’s Pacific Film Archive Theatre, located at the Berkeley Art Museum, 2575 Bancroft Way in Berkeley, at 7:00 p.m.

Director Scott Erickson and I will be there to introduce the film. After the screening, Koci will take the stage to be interviewed by Jeremy Rue, a lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. We’ll have cameras at the event to record Koci’s interview for publication on lynda.com at a later date. Hope to see you there!

By Crystal McCullough | Tuesday, February 01, 2011

lynda.com documentaries screening this week at SBIFF; tickets still available

Doyald at his drafting table.

A scene from Doyald Young, Logotype Designer. The film is one of the lynda.com documentaries selected for screening at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

We are incredibly honored that two of our own documentary films have been selected for screening at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, and we hope you’ll be able to attend one of the showings. Ticket packages are still available on the Santa Barbara International Film Festival site.

The films we will be screening were produced by lynda.com as part of our Creative Inspirations series of documentaries. The first is Doyald Young, Logotype Designer, directed by lynda.com senior live action director Scott Erickson. In this film, we look at the incredible life of and work by this legendary typographer, logotype desinger, author, and teacher who has inspired thousands of artists and students throughout his career.

Next will be our film Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist, also directed by Scott Erickson. The film explores Koci’s journey of discovery from a wide-eyed kid at the Ansel Adams Gallery to photojournalist and teacher of multimedia storytelling at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

The films will be shown on:

  • February 3 — 7:00 p.m.
  • February 4 — 10:00 a.m.
  • February 6 — 4:00 p.m.

All screenings will be at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, and each will be followed by Q&A sessions with members of the lynda.com documentary production team.

We hope you’ll be able to join us at a screening and take some time to catch some of the other films and events taking place.

By David Niles White | Thursday, December 23, 2010

The lynda.com documentary team goes behind the camera with Richard Koci Hernandez

The Ansel Adams Gallery in the Yosemite Valley is where multimedia journalist Richard ‘Koci’ Hernandez was first inspired to take pictures at age 12. He hadn’t been back since and this was my first trip to Yosemite, so it was pretty exciting for both of us. We were joined by Creative Inspirations Director Scott Erickson and Cinematographer/Editor Mia Shimabuku.

After an amazing shoot in Yosemite, we shot at Koci’s home in the East Bay of San Francisco, as well as downtown in the Mission District and on campus at UC Berkeley where he teaches at the graduate school of Journalism. There’s almost always a camera in his hands and we were frequently pointing cameras at each other.

Our days on location were filled with awe and inspiration. From the waterfalls in Yosemite to the amazing work Koci is doing in depressed areas of the city to interviews in historic Northgate Hall, one of UC Berkeley’s historic landmarks. The images and narrative that comprise this installment of lynda.com’s flagship documentary series are moving and thought provoking. Our team is pleased and proud to present our latest Creative Inspirations documentary, Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist.

Series director Scott Erickson prepares Koci for an early morning shoot on the road to Yosemite.

Series director Scott Erickson (right) prepares Koci for an early morning shoot on the road to Yosemite. In the background, cinematographer/editor Mia Shimabuku sets up her first shot.

Mia takes her first shots outside of the famous tunnel that leads to the Yosemite Valley.

Mia takes her first shots outside of the famous tunnel that leads to the Yosemite Valley.

Mia and Scott shooting in Yosemite Valley.

Mia and Scott shooting in Yosemite Valley.

Koci is trying to re-create one of his first photographs taken at age 12. The actual slide is in his left hand.  Scott and Mia capture the moment.

Koci is trying to re-create one of his first photographs taken at age 12. The actual slide is in his left hand. Scott and Mia capture the moment.

Scott and Mia shooting Koci in San Francisco's Mission District.

Scott and Mia shooting Koci in San Francisco's Mission District.

Mia and Koci square off in the Mission District.

Mia and Koci square off in the Mission District.

Scott and Mia getting background shots in front of UC Berkeley's Campanile.

Scott and Mia getting background shots in front of UC Berkeley's Campanile.

By Bonnie Bills | Thursday, December 16, 2010

New business course shows how to effectively move projects and product ideas forward

It’s here! You’ve watched the previews, and now the new lynda.com business course, Pitching Projects and Products to Executives, is live in the Online Training Library®. Let us know what you think!

In Pitching Projects and Products to Executives, author Dane Howard interviews executives and product managers from renowned design firms and corporations like Google, Apple, and Adobe, who share their insider take on how to effectively move projects and product ideas forward. Video and multimedia producer Richard Koci Hernandez weaves the interviews together into a captivating visual narrative. The course shows the practical techniques, processes, and communication styles employed to sell to executives more effectively, and to bring ideas to life.

By Bonnie Bills | Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Pitching Projects and Products to Executives, part V: How do you find new ideas?

lynda.com will be releasing a new and very different course in our business segment soon, and your feedback on our preview videos here on the blog so far has been great! Please keep it coming. This is the fifth sneak peek to give you a sense for the course to come.

In today’s preview of the upcoming lynda.com course Pitching Projects and Products to Executives, Charles Warren, manager of mobile user experience at Google, answers the question, “How do you find new ideas?”

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