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By Todd Dewett | Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Managing Wayward Projects

Restarting wayward projects

Many management roles revolve around projects—a work structure that can be easy to understand but difficult to master. The first tip this week addresses a crucial aspect of project management: what to do when you lose momentum.

Projects occasionally falter or reach a standstill. They might even be formally paused by management so a team can focus on higher–priority initiatives. Whatever the reason, if you’re running the show when your project stops making progress, it might be time to restart the project.

By Kristin Ellison | Monday, March 31, 2014

3 Ways to Get Your Novel Ideas Approved (AUDIO)

3 ways to get your novel ideas approved

What do we do when we present a great novel idea to our higher–ups and they don’t approve it? We often start generating less novel ideas—and that benefits no one. Listen to creativity expert Stefan Mumaw as he explains how to sell your novel ideas to stakeholders so they see their value, and put them into action.

Know what’s important to your audience and then sell it through that lens.

By Jolie Miller | Monday, August 05, 2013

Optimizing small projects

Manage small projects effectively

How do you manage small business projects while staying on top of deliverables and deadlines? It’s easy to assume that small projects don’t require the degree of project management that larger projects do—that they’re simple enough to keep all the details in your head. But this is a dangerous assumption.

While it’s true that small projects shouldn’t require as much planning, management, or follow-through as larger, distributed projects, you’ll get much more out of your small projects with some careful forethought. Here are four tips to help keep your small projects on track:

By Bonnie Biafore | Friday, May 03, 2013

5 project management tips

Projects have a lot of moving parts—objectives to achieve, tasks to complete, people to manage, and more. When those parts interact as smoothly as a Swiss watch, everyone involved with the project is happier: the customer, stakeholders, team members who do the work, and project manager. Here are five tips to help any project run more smoothly.

1. Start by identifying what the project is really about.

Like starting your day with a nutritious breakfast, figuring out the point of the project makes everything that follows work better. Focusing on the right goal from the beginning of the project makes it a lot easier to deliver what the customer wants at the project’s end. I can’t say it any better than Yogi Berra did: “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going because you might not get there.”

Some project goals are obvious—for example, getting a raccoon out of your pantry. But for most projects, you need to chip away to uncover the goal and the other elements that define the project.

By Dane Howard | Friday, February 01, 2013

The power of previsualization… what is “preVIZ”?

The power of preVIZ

PreVIZ is short for “previsualization.” It’s a technique that allows filmmakers to quickly visualize parts of a script to solve problems and inform planning and execution prior to a costly production phase. Oftentimes, this process creates momentum and excitement and helps you determine where to allocate your creative and financial efforts.

What if you had a looking glass into the future of your projects? What if you could help uncover what projects your firm would work on and what they’d look like? I discovered something amazing by watching several behind-the-scenes documentaries of my kids’ DVDs. This insight helped me identify an opportunity for a new type of design group at my company. I realized that filmmakers had developed a language and a methodology for creating their movies and telling their stories. I learned that the same process could be used to design anything from a website, product, service, or business strategy. Storytelling the future seemed like a very valuable proposition.

I was discovering the power of preVIZ.

By Jolie Miller | Saturday, December 17, 2011

Introducing Project Management Fundamentals

My first few years in publishing were spent writing and editing. On the page, it looked like my job was about making words work, and yet, it was so much more than that. Each new endeavor I spearheaded was truly a project, and it required me to switch between those analytical and creative hats every day. Soon, I came to realize  that my colleagues were the backbone of the project team, and the timelines and schedules I made and kept were an integral part of the project plan.

This writer somehow ended up in business—and was loving every minute of it. As a fascinated yet unintentional project manager, I wanted to embrace this role with the same attention I put into checking for comma splices and building instruction. What were the secrets to solid project management, and how could I put them to work?

In Project Management Fundamentals, author Bonnie Biafore answers these questions and more, sharing tried and true project management tips that she’s developed through years of real world experience. Whether you’re in charge of an IT installation, a web development project, or managing an event for employees, you’ll discover the value in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing a project.

While project management may sound relevant only for those who build bridges, manufacture medical devices, or install major software systems, the reality is that you probably have project management opportunities in your career if you’ve ever worked to create a specific outcome, service, or product (deliverable) within a finite time frame using time, tools, and people (resources). Largely, this includes a range of career types including, but not limited to, information technology, creative disciplines, and business.

One of Bonnie’s best tips for new and aspiring project managers is to learn the power of asking open-ended questions. Whether you’re asking project stakeholders (the people the project will affect) to explain their needs, communicating specs to technical teams, or simply corralling the efforts of a large team, open-ended questions like “What would you do in the future to prevent this problem?” and “What’s working well here?” can get the dialogue going and take discussions to new places.

Project Management Fundamentals is suited for all skill levels, including those new to the concept of project management and those hoping to figure out how some of their past projects could have gone more smoothly. With solid project management skills, you’ll be better poised to improve your company’s bottom line by delivering your projects on time and within budget. Plus, I think you’ll learn to enjoy the process—embracing project management is a surprisingly creative process that carries the great reward of better business outcomes and happier customers.

Interested in more? • All business courses on lynda.com • All courses by Bonnie-Biafore on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:Project 2010 Essential TrainingTime Management FundamentalsEffective MeetingsExcel 2010: Financial Functions in Depth

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