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By Mark Niemann-Ross | Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Code Clinic 6: Building Dynamic Websites

code clinic 6

When the Internet first made an appearance, it was nothing more than a collection of fixed web pages. Back then, web pages didn’t use external data to build the dynamic sites we now expect as a daily experience. Incorporating real-time data such as finance, weather, updates from friends or the status of a thermostat changed the Internet from a static library of reference materials into a busy highway of information.

Code Clinic Six challenges our authors to use their language of choice to merge data with a web page template.

We’re starting with files created by James Williamson for chapter nine of his Dreamweaver CC Essential Training course, but instead of manually inserting the data into the page, we’re using code to bring the data and the HTML together.

By Starshine Roshell | Friday, December 05, 2014

Professor Gives Students 'Bang for Buck': Swaps Books for lynda.com

John Drake adopts flipped classroom to give students more value

“I’m doing it. Next semester, I’m going all in with lynda.com.”

So begins a recent blog post by John Drake, a web development professor at East Carolina University.

“I plan on chucking my existing textbook and instead requiring students to use the training videos to learn HTML, CSS, and PHP. … I am done lecturing in the classroom for this course.”

By Mark Niemann-Ross | Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Code Clinic: Program a Musical Instrument

2014_10_22_CodeClinicHero

If you want to learn to program, you can’t do better than watching an expert coder at work.

Code Clinic is a series of courses from lynda.com that gives you a front-row seat to watch a panel of expert authors solve computer challenges—and this fourth Code Clinic challenge is deceptively simple:

Create a musical instrument using the mouse.

By Joseph Lowery | Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Crafting Artisanal Web Apps with Laravel

2014_10_14_Laravel

Is your PHP development bogged down in the past, mired in manual-derived basic syntax, and endlessly recreating the same core tasks?

Well, my Sisyphean friend, step away from that inelegant coding boulder and consider Laravel, a modern PHP framework.

In this article, I’ll introduce you to a few of the key aspects that make Laravel a standout framework which many web application developers consider more than just a breath of fresh air: It’s a PHP coder’s hyperbaric chamber.

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Thursday, July 24, 2014

Create Responsive Featured Images in WordPress

Create Responsive Featured Images in WordPress

Responsive layouts have become commonplace in today’s web experiences, but the current HTML <img> element still has a fundamental flaw when used with responsive designs: It assumes uniformity in the screens it’s displayed upon, a uniformity that doesn’t exist in today’s mobile-saturated world.

Consider an image on a web page from the viewer’s perspective. Although it appears to be part of the page, it’s actually a replaced element: The code of the page cuts a hole in the page big enough to contain the image, and then retrieves it from its remote location to fill that hole. In some cases the hole has a specified width and height; in others the hole is built to be flexible and scale to a percentage, or proportion, of the screen size.

By David Powers | Saturday, July 19, 2014

Send Email from a Web Form with PHP

Use PHP to send the contents of a web form via email

Sending the contents of an online form to an email address is one of the most useful applications of PHP. It’s not difficult; but it’s easy to make a mistake. In this article, I’ll show you how to avoid common pitfalls that arise when sending the contents of a form with PHP.

By David Powers | Tuesday, July 15, 2014

How Do I Learn PHP?

How do I learn PHP?

One piece of advice sticks in my mind from the days when I started learning PHP: “Just read the PHP online documentation. You don’t need anything else.” PHP’s online manual is excellent, and contains lots of practical examples. But it was like throwing me a Chinese dictionary and telling me it contained all I needed to learn the language. I had no idea where to start.

By Mark Niemann-Ross | Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Code Clinic: 6 Problems in 6 Programming Languages

CodeClinic

“Learn to code!” It’s the latest buzzphrase. Everyone from Barack Obama to Will.i.am is talking up the importance of learning a programming language—which is good. But it’s only part of the story.

Successful programmers know more than just a computer language. They also know how to think about solving problems. They use “computational thinking”: breaking a problem down into segments that lend themselves to computer solutions.

Our Developer content at lynda.com already provides a wealth of programming courses geared towards all levels of experience. Starting this month, we’ll also delve into computational thinking—with a unique new set of courses called Code Clinic.

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