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By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Reduce Glare in a Photograph

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It’s a fact of nature: Light reflects off shiny surfaces. But that glare often distracts from the subject of your photographs, especially when they contain text or other small details, like the subject of this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques—the board game Landslide. (Race to become the next President of the United States in the Parker Brothers “Game of Power Politics.”)

Deke has two different fixes for glare, and they both involve Adobe Photoshop.

By Derrick Story | Tuesday, June 03, 2014

One Library Shared by Both Aperture and Lightroom

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Aperture or Lightroom?

Some photographers just can’t decide. And to be honest, for image editing, they don’t have to.

That’s because both Aperture and Lightroom can be configured to share the same collection of master images. Keep all of your photos in one directory—on your computer or external hard drive—then “point”each application to them.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Sunday, June 01, 2014

3 Ways to Keep Your Images from Being Stolen

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Taking photos is fun—but sharing them over the Internet is what photography is all about these days. Unfortunately some people want to share your photos more than you’d like them to. In addition to registering your photographs with the U.S. Copyright Office, here are three easy steps to take to protect your images online.

By Tim Grey | Thursday, May 15, 2014

Why You Should Add Keywords and Metadata to Your Photos

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One of the real advantages of digital photography over film photography is metadata. As soon as we capture a photograph digitally, we have a tremendous amount of information available about that photo. This information is generated automatically by the camera, so it relates primarily to the equipment and camera settings used to capture it.

For example, you can easily review which camera and lens were used, as well as the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO setting. These details can be helpful when evaluating images later or searching for a particular photo. They can even help you improve your photography by letting you identify the settings that worked best for a particular situation.

By Derrick Story | Thursday, May 08, 2014

Use the New Flickr to Promote the New You

Use the new Flickr to promote the new You

Flickr’s new “People You Follow” stream does an excellent job of showcasing photographers you like. But don’t forget this is a two-way street—there are also people following the images you post.

Are you leveraging this opportunity to shine in the eyes of thousands? Here are a few tips to improve your Flickr presence.

By Tim Grey | Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Batch Processing in Adobe Camera Raw

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One of the best-kept secrets of Adobe Camera Raw is that you can process multiple photos in batch, synchronizing settings across multiple images, and even fine-tuning the settings for each image individually. This provides a workflow that’s easy and efficient to implement—especially compared to using an action for batch processing multiple images within Photoshop.

I recommend getting started in Adobe Bridge, where you can make use of the Filter panel (available from the Window menu) to filter images, selecting those you want to process. This generally involves images of the same basic subject that were captured at about the same time, with the same overall lighting conditions and exposure settings.

By Tim Grey | Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Capturing Clouds for Time-Lapse Photography

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Clouds are a popular subject for time-lapse photography, and for good reason: The result can produce a fascinating display of billowing buildups or a time-accelerated flow of clouds across the frame. But there are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind when shooting clouds as a sequence of images you plan to assemble into a time-lapse video.

By Vincent Versace | Thursday, May 01, 2014

4 Habits That Make It Easy to Find Your Photos

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Want a photography workflow that makes it easy to find images in your archive—using only basic logic and memory? Adopt these four habits now, and you’ll be able to find the photos you need later.

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