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By Jeff Carlson | Wednesday, September 10, 2014

iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus: the Cameras

Hands-on area at the Apple event

Hands-on area at the Apple event

The (literally) big news about the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus is the size and quality of the phones’ screens, but just as interesting is what Apple has done with the cameras inside them. I was at Apple’s event yesterday, and in addition to getting my hands (and wrist) on an Apple Watch, I was able to play with both phones.

By Jess Stratton | Monday, September 08, 2014

How to Blur Photo Details to Protect Your Privacy

2014-09-08-MPPblur

It’s easy to post pictures on social networks, but sometimes we’re looking at them from such small screens that it’s easy to miss tiny details that can compromise your privacy—or worse, someone else’s.

In this week’s Monday Productivity Pointers, I’ll show you how to easily blur or cover up a small portion of a photo before posting it on a social network.

By Derrick Story | Friday, September 05, 2014

Photography Hacks: Power Charging, Repurposed Loupe, MacGyver Box

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Power.

That’s the one thing all digital photographers need. So I’m going to show you a couple “off the beaten track” power sources for your digital devices.

I also have a quick tip for creating an on-the-go LCD magnifier and a handy MacGyver kit that fits in a repurposed filter box.

By Derrick Story | Saturday, August 30, 2014

Photography Hacks: Make an LCD Shade, Battery Protector, and Lighting Field Kit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Problem solving is an important part of photography. Most of us have had to overcome contrasty light to capture a pleasing portrait, or work around intrusive power lines that mar an otherwise beautiful landscape.

But devising creative solutions isn’t limited to working behind the lens.

How, for example, can we compose a shot on an LCD with intense sunlight overhead causing glare on our screen? Or what’s a safe and convenient way to transport our spare batteries?

Instead of spending time and money shopping for accessories that may or may not work, why not create the solutions ourselves? After all, we’re photographers. We solve problems.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, August 28, 2014

Raw vs. JPEG in Photoshop: A Practical View

2014_08_27_RawJPG3

We humans always need some issue to take sides on. For photographers, the Great Debate is whether to shoot in Raw or JPEG mode.

The answer to the question is yes: You can make great photos using either format.

By Scott Erickson | Saturday, August 16, 2014

Photographing the Photographer: Douglas Kirkland

2014_08_16_Kirkland

Marilyn. Audrey. Elizabeth. Cher. Ringo. Leo. Last names aren’t required when you rattle off the people who’ve sat before Douglas Kirkland’s lens.

With a career spanning almost 60 years, he has photographed some of the most iconic figures of popular culture.

On today, his 80th birthday, I can’t help but think of the day Douglas sat in front of my camera, and of the simple panic-inducing question I asked myself:

How do you photograph one of your photographic heroes?

The answer is simple: Do as he does.

By Justin Reznick | Friday, August 15, 2014

Photographing Waterfalls With Long Exposure

2014_08_15_waterfall1

There’s sort of a “rule” in outdoor photography that you should never shoot long exposures of flowing water.

But I’m going to show you how rules can, and sometimes should, be broken.

By Jeff Carlson | Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Photographer Etiquette: Shooting on Location

Sparks Sunrise and Photographer

At Sparks Lake in Oregon, my fellow workshop participants and I parked in a designated lot in pre-dawn darkness. We unloaded our gear and snaked along a short, well-maintained trail to the lake’s edge and set up cameras and tripods on a rocky, raised overlook.

The sky, unfortunately cloudless, treated us to blue and purple hues as the sun rose to the right of two mountains, Broken Top and South Sister. I composed and captured a variety of images, and then noticed the sun was starting to break across the peak of Broken Top.

Just as I was setting up a new composition, I spied movement in my viewfinder. Another photographer came scrabbling along a tiny spit of rocks I was using to frame the mountaintop’s reflection and set up his tripod.

In my shot.

What’s the proper etiquette when you’re shooting on location?

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