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By Carolyn E. Wright | Tuesday, July 08, 2014

How to Copyright Your Photos

Eye of the Wolf

It’s easier than ever for someone to steal your photographs in this digital age. So it’s wise to consider your copyright options.

By law, the copyrights for your photographs are created when you click the shutter. Even if the photograph is never registered, the copyright exists and is protected by copyright law.

But the best way to protect your photographs is to register them with the US Copyright Office. Here’s how.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 03, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Prepare for Adventure

ipad_field_tulip_field

Modern photography typically works in two phases. First, you haul your cameras and associated gear on location and capture the images. Then, at some point later, you dump the photos onto a computer and really discover what you shot. Laptops bring these two events closer together, but most photographers already carry enough other gear that even a slim portable computer becomes overkill.

That’s one of the reasons the iPad makes an excellent photo companion. Thinner and lighter than a computer—especially the iPad mini—the iPad can slip into the pocket of a photo bag without weighing it down in the field. It offers a better look at the photos you capture while you’re on location, lets you edit and share photos right away, and sort the shots during travel or downtime.

By Kevin Steele | Friday, June 27, 2014

5 Sports Photography Tips: Capturing Motion

World Cup Dreams - © Kevin Steele - kevsteele.com

It seems like everyone is watching the World Cup this week. But sports photographers are watching it a little bit differently than most.

Shooting athletes is all about capturing human emotion and physical dynamic motion—the passion of the players in an instant of peak performance.

Whether you’re photographing professional soccer players in their last shot at victory, or capturing your kids’ first T-ball practice, here are a few sports photography tips to help you nab that powerful still image that conveys anything but stillness.

By Derrick Story | Thursday, June 26, 2014

Moving from Aperture to Lightroom

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Every time I pack up and move from one house to another, I say, “I’m never doing this again!” Moving is laborious, tedious, and at times, frustrating.

Switching from Aperture to Lightroom can feel the same.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Tuesday, June 17, 2014

3 More Ways to Keep Your Images from Being Stolen

DesertYucca

Photographers may think that there’s no way to keep others from “borrowing” their online images, but there are actually lots of things you can do—so many, in fact, that we needed two articles to tell you about them all! As a follow up to my recent post, “3 Ways to Keep Your Images from Being Stolen,” here are three more tips for protecting your online photos.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Reduce Glare in a Photograph

DT glare 6.3.14

It’s a fact of nature: Light reflects off shiny surfaces. But that glare often distracts from the subject of your photographs, especially when they contain text or other small details, like the subject of this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques—the board game Landslide. (Race to become the next President of the United States in the Parker Brothers “Game of Power Politics.”)

Deke has two different fixes for glare, and they both involve Adobe Photoshop.

By Derrick Story | Tuesday, June 03, 2014

One Library Shared by Both Aperture and Lightroom

hero_3-up_image

Aperture or Lightroom?

Some photographers just can’t decide. And to be honest, for image editing, they don’t have to.

That’s because both Aperture and Lightroom can be configured to share the same collection of master images. Keep all of your photos in one directory—on your computer or external hard drive—then “point”each application to them.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Sunday, June 01, 2014

3 Ways to Keep Your Images from Being Stolen

Horses galloping through snow

Taking photos is fun—but sharing them over the Internet is what photography is all about these days. Unfortunately some people want to share your photos more than you’d like them to. In addition to registering your photographs with the U.S. Copyright Office, here are three easy steps to take to protect your images online.

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