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By Jan Kabili | Monday, July 28, 2014

Find Your LIghtroom Photos Easily—with Keywords

2014_07_28_Lightroom1

Putting your finger on a particular photo in a large Lightroom library can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Keywords get my vote for the most powerful way to keep track of photos in Lightroom.

Here are my favorite tips for making keywording in Lightroom work for you:

By Joseph Linaschke | Thursday, July 24, 2014

Shoot Macro Photos — with a Pringles Can

PringlesCan_10

Macro photography requires a big investment in lots of expensive gear, right? Well, maybe not. With a little creative thinking, you can save money by doing some amazing things at home.

A ring light is an expensive but incredibly useful accessory for shooting flash photography of close-up objects. If you aren’t ready to invest in one, but want to play around with one, try this:

Using nothing more than a Pringles can and a few common household items, I’ll show you how to create softly lit macro photos with a pop-up flash.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Monday, July 21, 2014

5 Things You Must Do Before Starting a Photography Business

Elephants at Water

Friends are asking you to take their family photos. Strangers are inquiring about copies of your images. You’re thinking about trying to make some money from your photography.

But what do you need to get started? Here’s a checklist for getting started with your photography business.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 17, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos

ipad_field3_bikes

An iPad in your photo bag gives you more than just a way to check your email when you’ve finished shooting. In Part 1 of this series, I pointed out how the iPad can help you research photo locations. In Part 2, I demonstrated how valuable the iPad can be for importing and reviewing photos while you’re still capturing them on location.

But what happens after the shots are captured? Traditionally, you’d have to wait until you could transfer the photos from your memory cards to a computer for further work. With the iPad, though, you can get a jump on important post-processing tasks like rating and applying keywords while you’re still in the field and your memory’s fresh—and so they don’t loom over you when you get home.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 10, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

ipad_field2_grassy

The iPad is a great field companion for photographers looking to reduce their load of camera gear. From researching locations to checking shots on location and organizing photos afterwards, the iPad can be much more than a window into your Facebook stream—or even for watching training videos.

In Part 1 of the iPad Photography in the Field series, we looked at how an iPad (and iPhone, in some situations) can serve as a research assistant and location scout to determine where and when you should go shooting. In this installment, we’ll focus on making the most of your time on location.

By Carolyn E. Wright | Tuesday, July 08, 2014

How to Copyright Your Photos

Eye of the Wolf

It’s easier than ever for someone to steal your photographs in this digital age. So it’s wise to consider your copyright options.

By law, the copyrights for your photographs are created when you click the shutter. Even if the photograph is never registered, the copyright exists and is protected by copyright law.

But the best way to protect your photographs is to register them with the US Copyright Office. Here’s how.

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, July 03, 2014

iPad Photography in the Field: Prepare for Adventure

ipad_field_tulip_field

Modern photography typically works in two phases. First, you haul your cameras and associated gear on location and capture the images. Then, at some point later, you dump the photos onto a computer and really discover what you shot. Laptops bring these two events closer together, but most photographers already carry enough other gear that even a slim portable computer becomes overkill.

That’s one of the reasons the iPad makes an excellent photo companion. Thinner and lighter than a computer—especially the iPad mini—the iPad can slip into the pocket of a photo bag without weighing it down in the field. It offers a better look at the photos you capture while you’re on location, lets you edit and share photos right away, and sort the shots during travel or downtime.

By Kevin Steele | Friday, June 27, 2014

5 Sports Photography Tips: Capturing Motion

World Cup Dreams - © Kevin Steele - kevsteele.com

It seems like everyone is watching the World Cup this week. But sports photographers are watching it a little bit differently than most.

Shooting athletes is all about capturing human emotion and physical dynamic motion—the passion of the players in an instant of peak performance.

Whether you’re photographing professional soccer players in their last shot at victory, or capturing your kids’ first T-ball practice, here are a few sports photography tips to help you nab that powerful still image that conveys anything but stillness.

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