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By Doug Winnie | Friday, April 24, 2015

What to Expect Next Week at Microsoft Build 2015

Microsoft Build 2015

Looking back at the last year, Microsoft changed its strategy significantly and surprised the technology community with some announcements and reveals: deploying Office for iOS and Android, expanding the Azure cloud platform offerings, and creating a highly transparent development process for the next version of Windows 10.

Oh, and freaking holograms.

Guessing what will be revealed at Microsoft Build 2015 is difficult. But there are some open questions that need answers. Here are some that I feel need to be—and hope will be—addressed when the conference kicks off Wednesday in San Francisco:

By Starshine Roshell | Saturday, January 31, 2015

Microsoft Releases Outlook for iOS and Office for Android Tablets

2015_01_31_OfficeOutlook1

Yesterday Microsoft released Office for Android Tablets, which allows users to perform basic functions in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for free while requiring an Office 365 subscription for more advanced functionality.

They also released the long-awaited Outlook for iOS, rounding out the Office for iPad suite of individual apps. Available for free, this elegant app gives users the flexible email, calendar, and schedule workhorse on their iPads and iPhones.

An Android version is also available, though currently in Preview only. A final release for Android is most likely coming in the next few months.

Here’s what impressed us about these new apps.

By Doug Winnie | Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Review: The Microsoft Band Fitness Tracker and Smart Watch

The Microsoft Band has a lot of cool features.

Microsoft recently released the Microsoft Band, a fitness tracker and smart watch device. What makes it unique in a crowded and growing market for digital lifestyle wearables?

The Band has some impressive features, but comes with some bulk and awkwardness in fit. Let’s take a look.

By Nick Brazzi | Monday, November 03, 2014

Find Out What's Brand New in Outlook for Mac

The new Outlook for Mac looks much the same as the old

Microsoft has just released an all new version of Outlook for Mac, the productivity application for managing email, calendars, address books, and more—and we’ve got a first look course ready to get you up and running with this new version.

The course will be useful for new users. But if you’re upgrading from Outlook 2011, this transition is going to be really easy for you; the new version of Outlook for Mac has barely changed at all compared to Outlook 2011.

By Jess Stratton | Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Monday Productivity Pointers: Collaborating with SkyDrive

SkyDrive is a free collaboration product from Microsoft that helps you store and synchronize digital files across your desktop and mobile devices. With SkyDrive, you’ll get 7 gigabytes of space for storing your files, photos, and important assets, which can then be accessed from either a web browser or native applications on your desktop, tablet, or smartphone.

In this week’s first Monday Productivity Pointers video, I show you how to use SkyDrive directly within Microsoft apps like Windows 8 and Office 2013, and also work on new documents directly in your web browser. With your SkyDrive account, you’re also entitled to use the Microsoft Office Web Apps—online versions of Word, PowerPoint, and Excel—for free!

By Madeline Simmons | Friday, March 01, 2013

What is the difference between Office 365 and Office 2013?

Microsoft recently launched the new Office 365 as well as Office 2013. You are not alone if the various products have created confusion for you.

To clarify, Office 365 refers to the subscription models for Office, not a specific version, and it delivers the Office programs as part of your subscription. With online storage, sharing and syncing with the Microsoft cloud, Office 365 has features to make it easier for teams to collaborate and communicate with familiar applications like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

If you subscribe to Office 365 and are running Office on a Windows 7 or Windows 8 machine, you will see Office 2013 as your user interface. This means if you are a subscriber to Office 365, the lynda.com courses titled with version 2013 will be relevant and helpful for you. Microsoft is expected to push out updates to Office 365 on a quarterly basis, so over time we expect greater differences between these offerings. Rest assured, we are working to address the anticipated divergence between Office 365 and Office 2013 in our future training courses.

Suggested courses to watch next:

• Office 2013 New Features • Up and Running with Office Web Apps • Excel 2013 Essential Training

By Juliana Aldous | Monday, February 18, 2013

Getting to know Office 2013 and Office 365

Now that Microsoft has officially launched Office 365, we’d like to introduce you to our lineup of new Office training content.

You can use our new playlist feature to create your own personalized Office learning path. First determine which version of Office you’ll be using: Will you be starting with the cloud-based subscription Office 365? Or will you be taking the more traditional route with Office 2013? Note: if you are running Office 365 on a Windows 7 or 8, your version of Office will have the new features of Office 2013.

If you’re unfamiliar with the new Microsoft subscription model, I would suggest adding both David Rivers’s Up and Running with Office 365 and Curt Frye’s Up and Running with Office Web Apps to your playlist. David’s course introduces the Office 365 subscription model and how it works. Curt’s course takes you into the individual applications like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote.

The best course to start with to get an overall view of the latest Office features is David Rivers’s Office 2013 New Features. David walks you through the major applications in the suite: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Publisher, OneNote, and Outlook. Get a peek at integrating Office with the cloud. David covers the changes to the user interface, key new features, and product enhancements.

Figure 1 David Rivers shows you the suite.

David Rivers shows you the suite.

Figure 2 David Rivers takes you through the changes in Office 2013.

David Rivers takes you through the changes in Office 2013.

Figure 3 David Rivers shows you how to use SkyDrive with Office 2013.

David Rivers shows you how to use SkyDrive with Office 2013.

Once you’ve watched Office 2013 New Features, you’ll probably be ready to dive into your favorite Office application. We have more coming over the next few weeks, but to start you off we have Essential Training courses ready for SharePoint, Excel, Word, Access, Outlook, and PowerPoint.

If you use SharePoint, start off with Gini Courter’s SharePoint Foundation 2013 Essential Training. The Essential Training covers all the basics and features. You’ll also get a deeper look at how SharePoint integrates with all the Office applications.

Excel 2010 Essential Training has been one of our most highly viewed courses. Dennis Taylor takes you through all the basics from organizing your data to working with formulas, worksheets, pivot tables, and charts in Excel 2013 Essential Training.

Next up is David Rivers’s Word 2013 Essential Training. Learn the basics of creating and editing documents, using templates and building blocks, sharing and collaborating in documents, and working with tables.

If Access is more your thing, then take a look at Adam Wilbert’s course on Access 2013 Essential Training. Adam demonstrates how to create and work with tables, forms, reports, and macros and how to use that data in other Office applications such as Excel and Word.

Our newest staff author and productivity guru, Jess Stratton, has two Essential Training courses for you: PowerPoint 2013 Essential Training and Outlook 2013 Essential Training. In PowerPoint 2013 Essential Training, Jess shows you the basics of creating, editing, working with, and sharing presentations. In Outlook 2013 Essential Training, Jess gives you a tour of the interface and teaches you how to create, send, organize, and read mail; use contacts; leverage productivity with tasks and notes; and manage your day with Outlook.

Keep an eye on our new release list for more.

Interested in more?

• All lynda.com Office courses • All lynda.com Business courses

By Mark Niemann-Ross | Friday, October 26, 2012

What is Windows 8 going to change?

The user interface for Windows 8 blurs the line between tablet, desktop, and smartphone. That’s a good thing.

The Microsoft Build conference starts October 30. For a week developers will be exposed to the latest Windows technologies, analysts will write megabytes of blogs, pundits will tweet reactions both pro and con, and the way we experience computers will change in dramatic and obvious ways.

The new Windows 8 interface

For developers and users alike, the Windows 8 interface is an in-your-face change. No longer based around overlapping windows and desktops, information and applications are now presented as colored tiles. It is possible to slip back into the traditional Windows interface where each running application is visually separated with windows that can be dragged on top of each other, hidden, and closed; but most of the time the new Windows looks, and functions, very much like a well-designed webpage.

Opinions are harsh. Windows traditionalists miss familiar icons such as the Start menu, Control Panel, File Explorer, and Close button, and are finding the years they spent deciphering the nuances of utilities to now be irrelevant and useless. Worse, users stumble into the traditional Windows interface, but have no idea how to return to the new tiled interface, and developers find creating applications now requires new ways of programming, use of new interfaces, and new ways of thinking about interacting with users. What was Microsoft thinking?

DOS to Windows, windows to tiles, desktop to phone In 2011, computer vendors shipped more smartphones than desktop computers further supporting the idea that handheld devices—such as smartphones and tablets—are pushing desktop and laptop computers into obsolescence. Apple and Android are battling for first place, with Microsoft scrambling for a piece of the action. Dell, the king of laptop manufacturers, has lost almost half of its value in eight months. The future is painfully clear, and it looks like a handheld device, or smaller.

Microsoft correctly reasons that making improvements to an interface that depends on a keyboard and mouse is corporate suicide, but what about our former Windows Vista user futilely searching for the Windows Start button? Is there nothing to be done for them?

Short answer: The pain is only temporary.

Long answer: We’ve done this before. New interfaces, like apps or tiles, are simply normal innovation. They’re disruptive, sometimes annoying, and the first iteration is often clumsy, but the process is normal, expected, and necessary.

lynda.com is working on a collection of classes for developers and users of Windows 8. In the early part of 2013, you can expect to see courses that show how to get started with the Windows 8 developer tools, as well as more in-depth training intended to assist with advanced developer questions.

Nobody on Star Trek uses a mouse Science fiction explores a possible future, and most science fiction computers don’t use keyboards or mice; they use gestures and voice recognition. Our grandchildren will think our computers are quaint.

Personally, I have enough years under my belt to remember the jump from CPM, to DOS, to Windows 3, and the jump from my beloved Apple IIe to Macintosh OS X. Each was a move away from a known paradigm to something better. Everything changed for the traditionalists invested in the existing technology, and boy, did they complain.

But the number of people using the new tools soon outweighed the traditionalists. New users with curiosity about how the system does work, rather than assumptions about how the system should work took over.

Here’s to a lifetime of learning!

Interested in more? • The full Windows 8 Preview First Lookcourse on lynda.com • All operating systems courses on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:Windows 8 Metro App First Look • Windows 7 Essential TrainingMigrating from Windows XP to Windows 7

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