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By Jan Kabili | Friday, May 08, 2015

After the Shoot: New Photo Tools Series Offers Quick Tips

photo tools weekly

Learn new image-editing techniques in just a few minutes each week with our new series Photo Tools Weekly.

It’s all about photography after the shoot: tips and techniques to help you work smarter in programs like Photoshop and Lightroom, and with plug-ins and lesser-known apps, too.

Each week photographer Jan Kabili will focus on a post-processing technique or powerful app you can use to enhance your photos or improve your post-capture workflow. Each movie is 10 minutes or less—bite-sized and to the point.

Jan tells us who it’s for, why she created it, and what she’ll cover:

By Jan Kabili | Monday, July 28, 2014

Find Your Lightroom Photos Easily—with Keywords

2014_07_28_Lightroom1

Putting your finger on a particular photo in a large Lightroom library can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Keywords get my vote for the most powerful way to keep track of photos in Lightroom.

Here are my favorite tips for making keywording in Lightroom work for you:

By Jan Kabili | Wednesday, November 20, 2013

6 steps for creating dramatic skies in Lightroom

Creating dramatic skies with Adobe Lightroom

A dramatic sky can make a photograph look great. Lightroom’s Graduated Filter tool offers a quick way to enhance a sky without affecting the rest of the photo.

1. Select the Graduated Filter tool in the tool strip in the Develop module, or press M on your keyboard. In the dropdown Graduated Filter panel, double click Effect to set all the controls to their defaults.

2. Drag the Exposure slider in the panel to the left. This step is optional, but it’s a good way to see where a graduated filter is going to affect your photo.

By Jan Kabili | Monday, November 18, 2013

How to combine and modify presets in Lightroom

Many photographers rely on Develop presets to quickly change the appearance of photos in Adobe Lightroom. You can extend the power of presets by modifying them to meet your current needs, or by combining presets on a photo.

Modifying presets By modifying a preset, you can make a third-party preset your own or update one that you created yourself.

Modifying a preset in Lightroom

By Jan Kabili | Wednesday, November 13, 2013

5 tips for touching up your photos in Lightroom

You can quickly remove dust spots and unwanted content from your photos with Lightroom’s Spot Removal tool. These tips will help you make the most of the tool.

1. Get help visualizing spots

kabili_post5_window

When you’re viewing a photo on a small screen, you may not see all the tiny dust spots that can show up later in a print. Use the Spot Removal tool’s Visualize Spots option to locate subtle spots, like the dust on this window.

By Jan Kabili | Tuesday, November 12, 2013

How to create presets in Lightroom

Lightroom presets are a popular way to add great looks to your photos with just a few clicks. You can apply any of the presets that come with Lightroom or install third-party presets. When you’re feeling creative, make your own unique Develop presets by following these simple steps:

1. Adjust a representative photo

Faux HDR look preset

Open a photo into Lightroom’s Develop module, and adjust the image to the look you want using any of the controls in the panels on the right. For example, I’ve set the controls in the Basic panel to give this portrait a grungy faux HDR look.

By Jan Kabili | Monday, November 04, 2013

5 tips for importing your photos into Adobe Lightroom

1. Organizing before importing Before you start importing photos into Lightroom, it’s a good idea to set up a folder structure for your photos outside of Lightroom. Make a top-level “Lightroom Photos” folder to hold all the photos you’ll eventually import. This top-level folder is important because it will make it easier to move all your photos to a larger drive if necessary in the future. Inside the top-level folder, organize your existing photos into subfolders by shoot date or subject matter. The subfolders will help you locate files in the Folders panel in Lightroom’s Library.

kabili_post1_screenshot1

After organizing your existing photos into a folder structure like this, you can import them all into Lightroom together. Each time you import new photos after a shoot, you’ll have a well-organized folder structure ready to receive them.

By Crystal McCullough | Friday, June 11, 2010

lynda.com author Jan Kabili demos Photoshop CS5 features for Building 43

lynda.com’s Jan Kabili was recently interviewed by Robert Scoble for Building 43‘s blog. In the interview, Jan discusses those Photoshop CS5 features she’s most excited about, including Content-Aware fill, Puppet Warp, and HDR Pro. Jan is the author of lynda.com’s Photoshop CS5 New Features course.

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