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By David Blatner | Thursday, April 16, 2015

Making a Long Shadow in InDesign or Illustrator

Create a trendy long shadow

The long shadow is a fun, trendy effect and it’s a great way to make flat text and icons stand out—like those used to represent apps in iOS and Android.

Unlike a soft-edged drop shadow, though, the long shadow can’t be achieved with the click of a button in InDesign.

But this week’s InDesign Secrets shows you how to create a long shadow in InDesign in just a few steps. You’ll also learn how to move your design over to Illustrator and use a shortcut there to create a slightly more refined version of the same effect.

By Anne-Marie Concepción | Thursday, March 26, 2015

Use a Preset Photoshop or Illustrator Art Path in InDesign

2015_03_26_InDeSecrets

Learn how to make your InDesign layouts even more dynamic by customizing the shape of your image frames.

You can edit frames with the Pen tool—but why not use a preset art path from InDesign’s sister programs, Illustrator and Photoshop?

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, March 03, 2015

Assigning Multiple Strokes to Gradient Type in Illustrator

Add multiple strokes to type in illustrator

Today’s episode of Deke’s Techniques tackles a question from one of Deke’s many fans:

How do you add multiple strokes and a gradient to type in Illustrator? And in general, why does Illustrator sometimes seem to ignore your instructions when it comes to type?

The trick, Deke explains, is getting Illustrator to treat the text as a type object, not individual characters.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Correcting Brightness for Print — with Deke's Techniques

2015_01_27_Deke

When you create vibrant, continuous color artwork (like the flowering origami pattern shown in last week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques), you inevitably encounter problems when it comes to printing.

In particular, you might see banding in areas where colors transition and a general darkening effect. But it’s not a calibration problem; it’s a gamut problem.

The colors you see on your monitor aren’t always printable—even on sophisticated printers. When it comes down to it, you’re better off modifying the artwork than trying to tinker around with inks.

In this week’s free video, Deke shows how to correct brightness for print by taking your vector artwork into Photoshop, where you can better isolate and control the corrections.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Create a Flowering Origami Effect in Illustrator—with Deke's Techniques

create this origami effect in illustrator

Get the look of origami—without the paper cuts.

Learn how to turn the flowering vector artwork Deke showed you how to make in last week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques and use Adobe Illustrator’s dynamic effects to give it an origami effect that looks hand-folded.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Draw Flowering Vectors in Illustrator — with Deke's Techniques

learn to draw vectors in illustrator

Numbers abound in nature, from the golden ratio to Fibonacci sequences, which is why mathematically precise patterns are so pleasing to the human eye.

Want to create your own? In this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows you how to create “flowering” vectors in Illustrator using some simple shapes and scaling.

By Starshine Roshell | Sunday, January 04, 2015

Fitness Resolution for 2015? Learn While You Burn!

fitness resolution

It’s a fact. New year’s resolutions fall into two categories: want to and have to.

We want to do fun things like create stuff, tackle projects, pursue our interests, and master new toys. But we have to make time for the basics—like exercise.

The clever lynda.com fans you’re about to meet have all found a way to combine those two things: to check off the unavoidable have to of exercise while indulging in the gratifying want to of learning.

And some of them have even lost weight doing it.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Campaign Poster: Format and Copyfit Type in Illustrator

Format and copyfit type in Illustrator for a campaign poster

Today is Election Day across the United States. In celebration of this great democratic process, this week’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques features a campaign poster for an issue we can all get behind: the elimination of man-eating spiders.

But it’s not all fun and political games. This technique will show you how to format and copyfit large display type in Illustrator, making sure that your campaign promise fills the allotted space and that your message rings loud and clear.

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