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By lynda.com | Monday, January 12, 2015

Code Drives the World. Learn It on lynda.com.

Code is a new form of literacy in today’s world; it powers more and more of what we interact with each day. Learning some coding isn’t that difficult, but you may not realize the ways that programming can make you better at your job.

Find out how a little coding knowledge could enhance what you do this year, by exploring the infographic below. Below it, you’ll find lynda.com courses to get you started.

You’ll be surprised at how easy—and helpful—it is to add a bit of code savviness to your resume.

By Scott Fegette | Friday, January 09, 2015

Use the Popular MEAN Stack to Build Web Apps

What's the MEAN Stack?

Web technology evolves at Internet speeds, so finding the right combination of solutions for your web apps can be tricky for a web developer. From front-end frameworks to back-end server and database environments, arriving at the right blend of technologies for your projects takes experimentation, trial, and error.

If you’re looking to streamline your existing web app development workflow, the increasingly popular MEAN stack (a handy acronym referring to the combination of MongoDB, Express.JS, Angular.JS, and Node.JS) is a great choice. Here’s what it is, and how to get started with it.

By Mike Wong | Saturday, December 27, 2014

So You Want to Build Your First iOS App? Here's How.

build your first ios app

With over a million apps on the iTunes App Store, you might think that it’s easy to build an iOS app. And for experienced developers, that may very well be the case.

For guys like me, though—who have no experience with Objective-C (or Apple’s new programming language, Swift)—it’s harder than you think to build your first iOS app.

But it’s not impossible. You just need to know how to get started.

By Starshine Roshell | Friday, December 26, 2014

He Helps Fight Hunger in Rwanda. And lynda.com Helps Him.

2013-10-Sudan-Darfur-IDPCampVisit

At a time of year when many of us are filling our homes and our bellies with an abundance of delicious treats, Jules Rugwiro is fighting hunger in Rwanda.

Jules is a database manager with the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP), the largest humanitarian agency that addresses hunger.

“The work that we do includes providing food and/or cash for refugees, responding to emergencies, feeding school children, and connecting farmers to markets,” says Jules, a Rwandan who lives and works in Kigali, the nation’s capitol. “I collect information on whether food is available and accessible, and how it’s utilized by people in different parts of the country. Once we have this information, we identify who the vulnerable people are (i.e. those who are ‘food insecure’), where they live, how insecure they are, and why they are insecure. WFP bases its interventions on these results.

“If my job is not done properly, the most vulnerable people would not be identified and thus not assisted.”

How does he make sure his job is done properly?

“I learned most of my programming and database management skills through self-study and the material available on lynda.com,” says Jules, who studied information technology in school.

By Mark Niemann-Ross | Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Code Clinic 6: Building Dynamic Websites

code clinic 6

When the Internet first made an appearance, it was nothing more than a collection of fixed web pages. Back then, web pages didn’t use external data to build the dynamic sites we now expect as a daily experience. Incorporating real-time data such as finance, weather, updates from friends or the status of a thermostat changed the Internet from a static library of reference materials into a busy highway of information.

Code Clinic Six challenges our authors to use their language of choice to merge data with a web page template.

We’re starting with files created by James Williamson for chapter nine of his Dreamweaver CC Essential Training course, but instead of manually inserting the data into the page, we’re using code to bring the data and the HTML together.

By Simon Allardice | Friday, December 12, 2014

Developing Apple Watch Apps

apple_watch_apps

Apple recently released a beta version of Xcode 6.2 to developers worldwide. It includes the much-anticipated iOS 8.2 SDK featuring WatchKit, allowing us to develop for the much-anticipated Apple Watch.

Although the Apple Watch itself won’t be released until Spring 2015, with WatchKit now available we can start building apps for this exciting new wearable device right away.

By David Gassner | Thursday, December 11, 2014

Importing Android Projects for Eclipse into Android Studio

importing Eclipse projects into Android Studio

Android Studio has been in development for two years and has been available in the form of early access preview or beta editions for most of that time. Android developers have had plentiful opportunities to get to know the product as it has evolved—but since it’s been in constant flux, many developers have continued to use the venerable Eclipse bundle that includes the Android Developer Tools (ADT) plugin.  But this week things got real–Android Studio 1.0 has finally been released.

That was expected. A series of Release Candidates had appeared over the past few weeks and it was clear that a final release was imminent. But something else also happened. At the same time as the Android Studio release, Google removed all download links for the Eclipse/ADT bundle from the Android developer website. If you already have the Eclipse/ADT bundle installed, you can keep it using for now, but Google has stated that it won’t be doing any further development on the product or fixing any outstanding bugs.

So that means that as of RIGHT NOW, Android Studio is the only Google-approved IDE for Android developers. (Sorry, I didn’t mean to yell, but this is really really important.)  In this article, I’ll describe how to import Eclipse projects into Android Studio, and how to deal with some common issues you’ll encounter.

By Starshine Roshell | Friday, December 05, 2014

Professor Gives Students 'Bang for Buck': Swaps Books for lynda.com

John Drake adopts flipped classroom to give students more value

“I’m doing it. Next semester, I’m going all in with lynda.com.”

So begins a recent blog post by John Drake, a web development professor at East Carolina University.

“I plan on chucking my existing textbook and instead requiring students to use the training videos to learn HTML, CSS, and PHP. … I am done lecturing in the classroom for this course.”

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