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By Kristin Ellison | Friday, June 27, 2014

Create an Oozing Jelly Donut—Digitally

JellyDonut-fixed-WEB

This week, Bert walks us through turning a photo of a sugar donut into a jelly donut with a bite taken out of it.

His first step is removing the donut’s hole, so he selects the clone tool and clones from different areas of the donut to get a random effect with no duplication. Next, to create the bite effect, he clones from the background to remove that section of the donut and roughs out the edges.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Mask a Caricature Against a New Background

2014-06-24-DT

Last week Deke showed you how to turn a portrait into a crazy carnival-style caricature with Photoshop. This week, he’ll show you how to mask that caricature onto a more dramatic background using the Color Range command, Quick Mask mode, and a layer mask.

By Garrick Chow | Monday, June 23, 2014

Consider the Dingbat

dingbats-hero_image

Most people have dozens if not hundreds of fonts installed on their computers in the form of serif, sans-serif, mono-spaced, and script fonts. But an often overlooked font type is the dingbat font.

On the computer you’re using right now, especially if you have a version of Microsoft Office installed, you probably have at least a handful of dingbat fonts available, such Webdings, Wingdings, or Zapf Dingbats.

Unlike other types of fonts, which are collections of letters, special characters, and punctuation marks, dingbat fonts are collections of unique non-letter ornaments, symbols, or shapes. You’ve most likely checked out the dingbat fonts while trying to format a document, only to quickly dismiss them when you found there were no letters in those fonts.

By Anne-Marie Concepción | Thursday, June 12, 2014

Ghosting an Image Behind Text

2014.06.12_InDeSec

Need to place text (like a caption) over a busy image? Don’t strain your readers’ eyes.

Ghost the area behind that text—with InDesign. In this week’s InDesign Secrets, Anne-Marie Concepción shows you how to add a low-opacity fill to text frames that makes type easier to read, while still revealing a hint of the image beneath it. Ghosting an image isn’t spooky; it’s just a great trick.

Watch this week’s free movie, and check back next week for more InDesign Secrets.

By Kristin Ellison | Friday, June 06, 2014

Creating an Animated Theater Curtain (Part 3)

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Last week Bert showed us how to create an animated theater curtain. This week we’ll learn how to add a spotlight to the scene and animate the rising of the curtain to reveal a presentation behind it.

By Mike Rankin | Sunday, April 20, 2014

A Brief Introduction to Font Management

font-management-hero

In this article, I’ll review some of the basic information about fonts and how to manage them for best results, with information from my course Font Management Essential Training.

Many of us think of fonts as simply the text-styling tools in our font menu—things like Helvetica Light, Cooper Black, Arial Narrow, and Zapf Dingbats. But fonts are much more than choices in a menu.

Ellen Lupton said, “Typography is what language looks like.” If this is true, then fonts are the tools we use to make language visible and enhance its meaning in type. And what amazing tools they are!

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Create Your Own Chinese Seal in Illustrator

Create your own Chinese seal in Illustrator

You can sign your name to your artwork—or better yet, you can stamp it. In this special episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows how to transform your name into a Chinese seal, also known as a chop.

By David Blatner | Thursday, March 13, 2014

Using conditional text in InDesign: InDesign Secrets

Using conditional text

The best designers try to get the most use out of every InDesign document. They avoid recreating documents to accommodate small variations. In this episode of InDesign Secrets, David Blatner reveals the savvy designer’s trick for creating several different versions of a design, each with different text and images, all stored in a single InDesign file. This technique uses what’s called conditional text, also covered at length in David’s course InDesign Insider Training: Beyond the Essentials. Using conditional text in InDesign is a great way to address different audiences, different languages, different pricing structures, and more, all within the same document. You simply turn on the right condition and export the version of the document you need. Watch now to get started.

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