Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Thursday, September 04, 2014

WordPress 4.0: Improved Internationalization and UX

morten-wp4-hero

To cap off the summer, WordPress is crossing the 4.0 milestone with its newest release code-named “Benny”, named after jazz great Benny Goodman.

For an open-source application that now powers 23% of the web, this is a very big deal. In response to its widespread adoption, the WordPress development team is putting a strong emphasis on user experience and accessibility in this release. The result is a 4.0 release that feels more like the maturing of a young and feisty wine than a box of new goodies.

Some will see this as a bit of an anti-climax; we’ve come to expect big additions and UI changes with full number releases of WordPress. But in reality it’s more exciting than a new set of features as it shows that WordPress has reached a point in its development where it can start refining itself more often than throwing new features and ideas at the wall to see what sticks.

That said, there are plenty of innovations and updates to talk about in WordPress 4.0.

By Lauren Mackenzie | Thursday, April 24, 2014

Choose a Web CMS (WordPress, Drupal, or Joomla!)

choose-a-cms-graphic

Can’t decide which content management system (CMS) suits your needs? It’s not an easy task. But by clearly defining what you want it to do—and being aware of your technical skill limits—you can identify the best CMS for your purpose.

Let’s start with the basics. A CMS is a software program that makes it easy for you to create and publish digital content on a digital device. WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla are the most popular and used worldwide. They’re in open-source format—which means they’re regularly updated by a massive global community to ensure they can support developing online technology. You can download them immediately for free but you have the option to pay for additional premium features.

By Cynthia Scott | Wednesday, November 02, 2011

lynda.com author Jen Kramer on the latest Joomla! news

I recently caught up with lynda.com author Jen Kramer, and she filled me in on what a wild ride Joomla has had this year. SinceJoomla! 1.6 Essential Training and Joomla! 1.6: Creating and Editing Custom Templates were released in our library, there has been a lot of great news to report, according to Jen:

First of all, back in February, I discussed Joomla’s new software release cycle. We are still on track with this new software release cycle, with Joomla 1.7 successfully released in July 2011. Even better, the promised ‘one-click’ updates were also available, and most people had no trouble transitioning their Joomla 1.6 sites to Joomla 1.7. That’s a huge win for Joomla, and I’m so pleased it turned out well!

Joomla 1.8, due in January 2012 as a long-term release supported for 18 months, is still on track for release, however, it’s no longer called Joomla 1.8. The new name is Joomla 2.5, with Joomla 3.0 to be released in July 2012.

Here’s the revised table of software releases:

Release Name

Type of Release

Release Date

End of Life

Joomla 1.5long-termJanuary 2008April 2012
Joomla 1.6short-termJanuary 2011August 2011
Joomla 1.7short-termJuly 2011February 2012
Joomla 2.5long-termJanuary 2012At least 18 months
Joomla 3.0short-termJuly 2012February 2013
Joomla 3.1short-termJanuary 2013August 2013
Joomla 3.5long-termJuly 2013At least 18 months

Each group of three Joomla releases comprise a release series. Joomla 1.6, 1.7, and 2.5 are one series, while Joomla 3.0, 3.1, and 3.5 will be another series. Each series consists of two short-term releases and one long-term release. Major changes to Joomla, such as a completely new administrator interface or changes to the way extensions are coded, would only be included at the start of a series. This policy was put into effect in the Joomla 1.6 to 1.7 transition.

There are minor differences between Joomla 1.6 and 1.7. For example, Joomla 1.7 has the ability to specify a background image on a custom HTML module, while Joomla 1.6 does not. However, Joomla 1.6 and 1.7 are about 98% similar from a site builder’s perspective. You should be able to followJoomla! 1.6 Essential TrainingandJoomla! 1.6: Creating and Editing Custom Templates with very little trouble using Joomla 1.7. The same should also be true for Joomla 2.5.

What about clients who are still running Joomla 1.5? Recently, I wrote an extensive Joomla! Community Magazine™ article describing the Joomla 1.5 to 2.5 transition, including business and technical considerations when planning those migrations. At my company, we are moving some Joomla 1.5 sites to Joomla 1.7 now. For other sites, we’ll move them early next year. We’ve started the process of notifying our clients about the upcoming migrations now, so they can organize their resources for the move. As for new sites, we are building them in Joomla 1.7 wherever possible.

Planning for the Joomla 3.x series began at an in-person planning session on October 21 in New York City. You can watch the video from the Joomla planning sessions as well. Watch for more Joomla videos coming to the lynda.com Online Training Library® soon!

By Cynthia Scott | Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Joomla! development news: an interview with Jen Kramer, lynda.com author

Learn how to make this web site in Joomla! 1.6 Essential Training with Joomla! author Jen Kramer.

As part of our ongoing training courses on content management systems, we’re soon to release a new course, Joomla! 1.6 Essential Training. If you’ve been watching Joomla! 1.6 Beta Preview, that course will be coming off of the Library soon and replaced with Joomla! 1.6 Essential Training.

I had a chance to catch up with author Jen Kramer to talk to her about her experience with this software. She described the planned evolution of Joomla releases. I thought our members would like to hear about this unusual development plan.

Q: So what you’re saying is that Joomla 1.6 will evolve into 1.7. Then, Joomla 1.5 and Joomla 1.7 will merge together into Joomla 1.8. Is that right?

Well, not quite. Joomla’s development path has become considerably more complicated than it has been in the past.

These are all individual releases. Each release builds on the one before it. Joomla 1.5 will continue, parallel to Joomla 1.6 > 1.7. Then they will merge into 1.8

A full description of Joomla’s release plan is available at http://developer.joomla.org/strategy.html

Up until the release of Joomla 1.6, Joomla based their releases on feature sets. When the features were done, the software was released. Unfortunately, in an all-volunteer community (no one is paid for Joomla core development at this time), this lead to a very long time between releases. Joomla 1.5 was released in January 2008. Joomla 1.6 was released in January 2011—three years later.

Joomla has now moved to a time-based release cycle, which includes short-term (STR) and long-term support (LTS). Short-term releases will be in active development for 6 months, then reach the end of life 1 month after the next version’s release. Long-term support means the product will be good for a minimum of 15 months. The previously supported long term release will be supported for 3 months past the release of the new long term release.

Here’s a table describing key dates over the next year for Joomla’s release and support cycle.

Release NameType of ReleaseRelease DateEnd of Life
Joomla 1.5LTSJanuary 2008April 2012
Joomla 1.6STRJanuary 2011August 2011
Joomla 1.7STRJuly 2011February 2012
“Joomla 1.8”LTSJanuary 2012Unknown – at least 15 months

“Joomla 1.8” is what many people are calling the next LTS version of Joomla, but it’s not known what its exact name will be.

Q: What should people think about if they are deciding between Joomla 1.5 and Joomla 1.6 at this time for a new web site?

I would point to the schedule, and be very sure to factor this into your thinking. August is not far away (even though it feels like it, due the many feet of snow on the ground here in New Hampshire).

I have talked with a number of people in Joomla’s leadership. They have stated that migration from Joomla 1.6 to 1.7, then 1.7 to 1.8 will not be that difficult. They have also promised a migration tool for Joomla 1.6 to 1.7. There is no official Joomla migration tool available for Joomla 1.5 to 1.6 from Joomla.org; however, there is a third party tool available (http://www.matware.com.ar/joomla/jupgrade.html).

Easy migrations, unfortunately, are not borne out in past history in the Joomla project. I do not want to be in a position of building a site for a client in Joomla 1.6, only to tell them a short time later that I must upgrade their site to a new version—at some additional, and potentially significant, cost. If that cost is small, I’m fine with it, but again, the history points to difficulty in migrating.

If you’re building a new site in Joomla, and you really need one of the major new features in Joomla 1.6, you should definitely consider building there. In my mind, those new features are ACL (Access Control Levels), significantly improved accessibility in Joomla’s back end with the Hathor template, or possibly some of the templating features. The nested categories feature is flagged as a major new feature, but you can replicate that functionality easily in Joomla 1.5 with K2, Zoo, or another CCK (content construction kit) extension. If nested categories is all you need, I’d stick with 1.5.

I have said publicly, on my blog, that my company is still building sites in Joomla 1.5. That is not because Joomla 1.6 isn’t a great product. It’s got some absolutely fabulous new features we would love to use. But due to our concern over future migrations and support for them, we will stick with Joomla 1.5 for now.

Q: What should people think about if they are deciding to migrate a site from Joomla 1.5 to Joomla 1.6?

If you have an existing Joomla 1.5 site, and it’s working great for you, I would tell you NOT to migrate to 1.6. There’s absolutely no reason to do so in February 2011. However, you should be planning for February 2012, when you should definitely be migrating your site to Joomla 1.8.

Q: What kind of projects would be best for Joomla 1.5 versus Joomla1.6?

If you have a site that needs to comply with certain accessibility guidelines like Section 508 or WCAG, Joomla 1.6 is the way to go, no question. This is particularly true if the back end of the web site must meet accessibility guidelines. My good friend Andrea Tarr, who created the Hathor administrator template, tells me that it meets the WCAG 2.0 AA specification.

If you need the ability for many groups of users to see different content on the front end of the site, or if you need fine-grained control over who can create/edit/delete which content on the back end of the site, I would also go with Joomla 1.6. The new ACL (Access Control Levels) system is extremely powerful. (In fact, it’s so powerful that it’s possible to lock yourself out of the back end.) There’s not much documentation for ACL at this time, so be careful if you need to use the system. However, you can make Joomla do whatever you want where this is concerned.

Finally, if you have a project with fairly complicated templating, including a number of different variables for look and feel, you might be better off with Joomla 1.6.

Joomla 1.5 did a great job with templates, allowing you to override core output via a template override. However, a template override affects all views tied to that look. For example, if you override the look of a category blog, then every category blog on the site takes on that new look.

Layout overrides, available in Joomla 1.6, allow you to override the look of a specific instance of a category blog (or anything else).

You’ve always had the ability to set up parameters associated with your template. For example, you could configure a color style (tied to a specific stylesheet), configure a logo or title for the site, things like that. These vary with the specific type of template installed. You can see an example of this if you look at Joomla’s core rhuk_milkyway or JA_Purity templates in Joomla 1.5.

Template styles, new in Joomla 1.6, allow you to configure these parameters for specific pages. Now you have an easy way to make these pages red, those pages blue, and other pages green — all from a single template source, and all completely configurable by your client. You can assign a template style in the menu item for a given page, so your clients can handle setting up new pages with styles you configured for them. (Combine this with ACL, and you can lock the clients out of the template area, so they can’t change your configuration settings.) So if you’re building a template with a theme that lends itself to parameters and options, then Joomla 1.6 is also a good choice for you.

Q: What are some of the most engaging uses of Joomla you’ve seen?

Joomla is in use in 20 million sites worldwide. It powers 2.5% of the web. So that’s a pretty tough call, determining which sites are the most engaging.

If you’re looking for great examples of Joomla websites, check out the Joomla Showcase, which features sites built by community members in a variety of areas and languages.

Steve Burge has done a series of blog posts profiling some big names using Joomla for their sites, including eBay; General Electric; Palm; the governments of the UK, Australia, Mongolia, and Ethiopia; Pizza Hut; McDonald’s; and many others. You can read more at http://community.joomla.org/labels/joomla-portfolio.html.

Q: What foundation skills would people need to get the most out of Joomla! 1.6 Essential Training?

I’ve targeted Joomla! 1.6 Essential Training to those who have some experience building websites before, whether that’s with Dreamweaver, FrontPage, or another CMS. Mostly, that’s due to the language I use in the course. For example, I assume you know what the words HTML and CSS mean, if I used those terms in a sentence. However, there’s little coding in this title. Mostly it’s button-clicking, showing you how to set up a site from start to finish.

Q: What other related courses do you have in the Online Training Library®?

I have some other titles that may interest readers. They may already be familiar with Joomla 1.5: Creating and Editing Custom Templatesand Joomla 1.5: Styling with CSS.

My favorite title is Web site Strategy and Planning, which covers how to plan a web site before you ever start clicking around.

And Preparing CMS Web Graphics and Layouts Using Open Source Toolsshows all of the prep work, getting a comp ready for conversion to a CMS template or theme, using GIMP (an open source substitute for Photoshop) and KompoZer (an open source substitute for Dreamweaver).

Q: One question I’ve always wondered about. Why the exclamation mark?

Yeah, they weren’t really thinking clearly when they did that. In general, people use the exclamation point in the titles/headlines of articles, but not in the main text.

Author Jen Kramer will be hosting Joomla User Group New England on April 2, 2011 at Marlboro College Graduate School. You are welcome to join members of the Joomla leadership, business owners and instructors to learn the latest skills and techniques used in Joomla 1.6. For more info, go to www.joomladaynewengland.org.

By Samara Iodice | Wednesday, November 03, 2010

A lynda.com training producer learns Joomla, and practices what we teach

Video shot by lynda.com’s Taymar Pixley and Lucas Deming, and edited by Chris Chan Lee. Starring author Jen Kramer and training producer Samara Iodice.

You may be surprised to discover that behind every lynda.com author is a training producer, like me, who oversees all aspects of course production—from content development, to script review, to graphics creation, to booth and/or live action recording, and eventually publishing in the Online Training Library®. You may be even more surprised to learn that lynda.com training producers are not usually experts in the software for the courses they produce. In fact, often the first experience I have with a certain piece of software is in reviewing the early draft of a course table of contents in preparation for beginning work with an author. That doesn’t mean training producers aren’t extremely knowledgeable about the course content, but where the author must know details of how every individual feature of the software functions, the training producer is looking at something completely different—the overall educational integrity of the course and associated exercise files.

Some training producers are experts in some software programs—it’s often how our career path brought us to where we are. Some of us are experts in certain products; all of us are skilled in many products, are very technologically savvy, and learn new software quite easily. Before becoming a training producer at lynda.com, my software expertise was in the computer-aided-drafting (CAD) area, having used AutoCAD extensively in my previous career as an engineer, and also in the web design area, using Dreamweaver for the last several versions.

One area of web design I had become increasingly interested in was the use of content management systems (CMS) such as Drupal, WordPress, and Joomla to create web sites that could be more easily maintained than the traditional static web site. So, when the opportunity arose to produce a Joomla title with the very enthusiastic author, Jen Kramer, I jumped right in. I was particularly excited to learn a CMS because I’d been doing volunteer media work for a youth-run nonprofit, Everybody Dance Now, and the teenage leaders desperately needed a new, modern web site they could learn to maintain themselves.

So, after a week of recording with Jen Kramer, I had my first real taste of Joomla, and that, in turn, stimulated my appetite to watch many of the other Joomla and CMS offerings in the lynda.com Online Training Library®. Before I knew it, I had designed a new Joomla-based national web site for the young ladies of Everybody Dance Now, and was being called upon to design other chapter web sites around the country for the same organization, in addition to providing training for those chapters to maintain their own sites. It’s been a whirlwind of volunteer activity that I wouldn’t have been able to participate in, had I not fully immersed myself in the lynda.com Online Training Library® to learn a new topic.

Joomla 1.6 Beta Preview Course Trailer

Click to watch the trailer for Jen's Joomla course.

With the release of Jen Kramer’s Joomla! 1.6 Beta Preview title last week, many people are wondering what Joomla and other content management systems are all about, and how they can apply this technology in their own lives. I’m hoping that sharing my experience as a training producer practicing what we, at lynda.com, teach will help inspire lynda.com members to investigate Joomla and all the various content management systems in the library, and discover these practical and highly-effective solutions for creating and maintaining a powerful web presence.

Watch Jen’s course, Joomla! 1.6 Beta Preview, and learn more about Joomla at the Joomla web site.

By Garrick Chow | Thursday, December 17, 2009

Using open source software to integrate smart design with your CMS

In Preparing CMS Web Graphics and Layouts Using Open Source Tools, Jen Kramer shows us how developers and graphic designers can collaborate to create a great site design that integrates with a content management system (CMS) like WordPress, Drupal, or Joomla!, all using open-source software. So if you’ve been trying to find an effective, yet inexpensive solution for integrating a CMS into your website, be sure to check this title out.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.