Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. Start your free trial

By Nancy Muir Boysen | Friday, May 22, 2015

Four Simple Ways to Improve Your Technical Writing

improve your technical writing

People in technical fields are often asked to write about technology—and the task can be daunting. After all, you’re not likely to have trained as a writer, learning the fine points or grammar or crafting an elegant sentence, because your focus has been to learn the ins and outs of a technical profession.

The good news is that you can make your technical writing easier for anyone to understand—whether or not your readers have a technical background—by mastering a few simple tips:

  • be concise
  • avoid jargon
  • use the active voice
  • be specific

By Jolie Miller | Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Instructional Design at lynda.com: How We Do What We Do

instructional design

One of the most common questions we get here at lynda.com is: How do you do what you do?

While there’s a certain amount of magic that happens on our campus (it’s impressive, I’ll be honest), a lot of our process boils down to simple instructional design principles for teaching adult learners.

Whether you’re teaching a friend how to knit, creating online instruction, or just want to be able to better communicate—these strategies don’t disappoint.

Here are my 10 favorite tips:

By Jeff Toister | Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Customer Service Tips: Offer the Worst-Case Scenario

Follow these customer service tips for happy customers

Employees have an opportunity to influence customer expectations with each interaction.

Many instinctively paint an overly rosy picture of the best-case scenario. They quote the fastest lead times, promise responsive service, or offer to sway their boss on a special request. It makes customers feel good in the moment—but they’re later disappointed when their high hopes go unfulfilled.

It seems counter-intuitive, but a better strategy is to give customers the worst-case scenario. It may wind up delighting them. Follow these customer service tips and see for yourself:

By Jethro Jones | Friday, October 24, 2014

Teachers: Prep Tips for Parent-Teacher Conferences

Make parent-teacher conferences easier

It’s that time of year. The leaves are changing, the air is cooling—and that means parent-teacher conferences are right around the corner.

Regardless of what format your school uses, parent-teacher conferences can be difficult when you have a student who’s struggling in one way or another; they’re hard for both the parent and the teacher.

Here are some tips to make sure conferences go smoothly for both parties.

By Jess Stratton | Monday, May 05, 2014

Write an Email That Gets Results

Write an email that gets results

Last week on Monday Productivity Pointers, I showed you how to write an email that gets read. Now that you’ve got your readers’ attention, let’s talk more about the content of that email. In particular, this week we’ll examine strategies for writing an email asking someone to do something—or giving someone an action item.

An action item could be a physical task, or a request to provide information. Whatever it is, you’re not just informing them about it in your email. Asking for something that needs to get done takes a special type of communication.

By Chelsea Adams | Sunday, April 13, 2014

3 business writing tips for non-writers

3 business writing tips for non-writers

How many emails have you written to colleagues, clients, or customers this week? If the answer is one or more, you should consider business writing as part of your job—even if the word “writer” is not in your title.

Business writing is any written communication to teammates, stakeholders, and other people you work with. The good news: You don’t have to be a creative writing major to be an excellent business writer; in fact, you don’t even have to be creative. All you need is the desire to communicate in a way that leaves your reader feeling informed and prepared to take action.

To help you get there, here are three of my favorite tips from the Business Writing Fundamentals course on lynda.com. For simplicity, I’m focusing on email here, but these tips can also be applied to handwritten notes, memos, printed letters, and more.

By Jess Stratton | Monday, March 31, 2014

Write a claim letter to a company: Monday Productivity Pointers

Write a claim letter

I’ve slipped a few nontechnical topics into Monday Productivity Pointers over the past year and they’ve proven to be popular, so this week I’m doing it again.

In today’s video, I’ll show you how to write a claim letter to a company for a faulty product or a bad experience. When you don’t get results from a claim letter, often the problem is that you never actually asked for a claim in the first place.

By Jeff Toister | Thursday, March 27, 2014

The secret to maintaining a customer service attitude

Maintaining a customer service attitude

Customer service professionals are expected to have a positive and friendly attitude at all times—but maintaining such an attitude isn’t always easy. Upset customers, challenging problems, or even fatigue can make it hard to keep smiling.

Attitude anchors are techniques you can use to help position your customer service attitude in a positive place, or even to repair a bad attitude when you’re feeling down. There are two kinds of attitude anchors: maintenance anchors and repair anchors.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Start your free trial

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.