Seasonal Savings: 20% off selected memberships for a limited time. Give now

Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Thursday, December 18, 2014

WordPress 4.1: A Crucial Update to End the Year

twentyfifteen-colors

What better way to cap off the year than with a new version of everyone’s favourite web publishing application? WordPress 4.1, code-named “Dinah” (after the legendary jazz vocalist Dinah Washington), is now live and ready for your WordPress-powered sites. WordPress 4.1 ships complete with both feature updates and a sparkling new theme—and I’ve got the skinny on what you’ll get when you click the Update Now button.

By Juliana Aldous | Monday, September 22, 2014

Collaborate and Communicate — with our Enterprise Content Management Courses

sharepoint2010.jpg1528594251

A presentation is due next week. The working document will need input from five people on your team and a review from your manager before it’s shared with the entire organization.

Chances are some of those people work on another floor, in another building, or even in another country.

How do you track the document as it passes through many hands in various locations—and where do you store it once you’re done? How do you make sure that the document is available next week or next year?

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Thursday, September 04, 2014

WordPress 4.0: Improved Internationalization and UX

morten-wp4-hero

To cap off the summer, WordPress is crossing the 4.0 milestone with its newest release code-named “Benny”, named after jazz great Benny Goodman.

For an open-source application that now powers 23% of the web, this is a very big deal. In response to its widespread adoption, the WordPress development team is putting a strong emphasis on user experience and accessibility in this release. The result is a 4.0 release that feels more like the maturing of a young and feisty wine than a box of new goodies.

Some will see this as a bit of an anti-climax; we’ve come to expect big additions and UI changes with full number releases of WordPress. But in reality it’s more exciting than a new set of features as it shows that WordPress has reached a point in its development where it can start refining itself more often than throwing new features and ideas at the wall to see what sticks.

That said, there are plenty of innovations and updates to talk about in WordPress 4.0.

By Lauren Mackenzie | Thursday, April 24, 2014

Choose a Web CMS (WordPress, Drupal, or Joomla!)

choose-a-cms-graphic

Can’t decide which content management system (CMS) suits your needs? It’s not an easy task. But by clearly defining what you want it to do—and being aware of your technical skill limits—you can identify the best CMS for your purpose.

Let’s start with the basics. A CMS is a software program that makes it easy for you to create and publish digital content on a digital device. WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla are the most popular and used worldwide. They’re in open-source format—which means they’re regularly updated by a massive global community to ensure they can support developing online technology. You can download them immediately for free but you have the option to pay for additional premium features.

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Thursday, April 17, 2014

What’s new in WordPress 3.9

wordpress-39

WordPress 3.9 “Smith,” named after James Oscar “Jimmy” Smith, was released yesterday. This new version of the popular web publishing app introduces several highly anticipated new features that make managing your WordPress site and its contents easier. Let’s break down the key new features of WordPress 3.9:

A more powerful Customizer The Customizer makes managing the appearance of your WordPress site easier by allowing you to see your edits as you make them and preview your theme configurations before you take them live. With the 3.9 update, two of the WordPress community’s most anxiously awaited feature requests have been added to the customizer to make it “complete”:

By Tom Geller | Friday, February 08, 2013

Plan for Drupal 8, build for Drupal 7

Rumor has it that early computer maker Osborne folded because it promoted its next-generation (but not-yet-released) model over the adequate (but sellable) one. People decided to wait, starving the company of revenue.

But while Drupal 8′s release is mere months away, there’s no reason to wait. Here’s why you should build your site now, in Drupal 7:

  • Drupal 7 will be good for a while. The community officially supports Drupal with security updates for two major releases. Drupal 6 came out in early 2008; Drupal 7 followed in early 2011. If the pattern continues, Drupal 7 won’t be obsolete until 2015 or later.
  • You’ll (probably) be able to upgrade your site to Drupal 8 later, as core Drupal is always upgradeable. The potential problem is in add-on modules and custom code, which sometimes lag. The good news is the biggie: Views is becoming part of Drupal core.
  • The cost for waiting is too great. While you wait for Drupal 8, your site stays locked in your imagination. There’ll always be something “even better” on the horizon.

So don’t fall victim to the Osborne Effect—build your dream Drupal site now!

By Morten Rand-Hendriksen | Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Why WordPress?

Why WordPress?

What makes WordPress a good solution? Why is it so popular? Regardless of the question, the answer is the same, and it can be boiled down to three simple words:

Because WordPress works.

Of course, it’s a little more complicated than that. Let me put it into context from the perspective of the three main users of WordPress: the end user, the site owner, and the designer/developer.

Easy to find, easy to use, easy to share

A poorly kept secret about WordPress is its findability. If someone asked you how to get indexed on Google and you answered “Just set up a WordPress site,” you would not be far from the truth. The way WordPress is built makes it a magnet for search engines and other online indexes. So much so that if you don’t want your WordPress site indexed, you have to take steps to prevent it from happening.

Out of the box, WordPress has great search and share optimization. With the addition of plugins like WordPress SEO, AddThis, and Facebook for WordPress, these built-in capabilities are further enhanced, giving any site the opportunity to become the next big thing on the web. This is provided the content is great, of course. We’ll get to that later.

The purpose of many websites is to put out easily findable, accessible, and shareable information. And WordPress does this in spades. When you are searching for content on the web today, you will likely find it on a WordPress site. If you are reading or viewing content on a WordPress site, you are able to access and interact with that content through comments and RSS feeds. And once you have read the content, you will have an easy time sharing it with your friends on social sharing sites and social media.

Easy to publish, easy to configure, easy to maintain

WordPress is a prime example of the virtues of open source. It is built, evolved, and maintained by the people that use it and is therefore in a constant state of forward-moving flux. For site owners this means by simply running a WordPress site and keeping it up to date, they are at any time using the most current web technologies to communicate with the world.

Over the past three years, WordPress has undergone several fundamental design and development changes that have made an already easy-to-use application even easier to use. At the same time it has become more powerful and diverse. From how it is installed to how a site owner can publish content and interact with visitors, WordPress leads the way in removing the barriers that prevent anyone from publishing online. Between WordPress.com and self-hosted WordPress, most people with access to an Internet connection are now able to publish their thoughts, ideas, and creations online with minimal effort. With the challenges of web technologies all but removed, the site owner can focus on what matters: producing and publishing excellent content to share with the world.

Easy to build, easy to augment, easy to evolve

For me, the true power of WordPress lies in the back end. Whether you are a complete novice or a seasoned pro, building themes and plugins for WordPress will make your life easier and will enable you to do more in less time. I am walking proof.

With a design in place, building a custom WordPress site from scratch—one that looks and behaves nothing like what is expected of a WordPress site but is still just as easy to use and maintain—takes less time than with any other platform I have tried. When people ask me what WordPress can do I answer, “Whatever you want it to do.” And I stand by that statement. At its core, WordPress is a simple interface between the site owner, the database, and the end user. All the stuff in between (administration, themes, and functionalities) is available for the designer and developer to play with and add to in any way they want. And because WordPress is open source, people can step in and contribute to the WordPress community in whatever capacity they feel fit, from answering questions in the forums and building free themes or plugins to contributing to WordPress Core.

The bottom line

Though it may sound like I see WordPress as the be-all and end-all of web publishing, the reality is I am a pragmatic platform agnostic. The reason I laud WordPress and why I love teaching people about WordPress is because I see it as one of the best available solutions for most websites today. I have and continue to work with other solutions including Drupal and Joomla!, but for most of the websites I encounter, WordPress is one of the best options.

Whether you are just starting to play with the idea of publishing a blog, you want to become a web designer or developer, or if you already know all there is to know about the web and you just want to play with something new, WordPress is a great tool to use. It has both the ease of use and the advanced features to suit pretty much any need. And when that need isn’t met, a theme, a plugin, or an extension is there to fill the void.

Interested in more?

Suggested courses to watch next:

By Cynthia Scott | Wednesday, November 02, 2011

lynda.com author Jen Kramer on the latest Joomla! news

I recently caught up with lynda.com author Jen Kramer, and she filled me in on what a wild ride Joomla has had this year. SinceJoomla! 1.6 Essential Training and Joomla! 1.6: Creating and Editing Custom Templates were released in our library, there has been a lot of great news to report, according to Jen:

First of all, back in February, I discussed Joomla’s new software release cycle. We are still on track with this new software release cycle, with Joomla 1.7 successfully released in July 2011. Even better, the promised ‘one-click’ updates were also available, and most people had no trouble transitioning their Joomla 1.6 sites to Joomla 1.7. That’s a huge win for Joomla, and I’m so pleased it turned out well!

Joomla 1.8, due in January 2012 as a long-term release supported for 18 months, is still on track for release, however, it’s no longer called Joomla 1.8. The new name is Joomla 2.5, with Joomla 3.0 to be released in July 2012.

Here’s the revised table of software releases:

Release Name

Type of Release

Release Date

End of Life

Joomla 1.5long-termJanuary 2008April 2012
Joomla 1.6short-termJanuary 2011August 2011
Joomla 1.7short-termJuly 2011February 2012
Joomla 2.5long-termJanuary 2012At least 18 months
Joomla 3.0short-termJuly 2012February 2013
Joomla 3.1short-termJanuary 2013August 2013
Joomla 3.5long-termJuly 2013At least 18 months

Each group of three Joomla releases comprise a release series. Joomla 1.6, 1.7, and 2.5 are one series, while Joomla 3.0, 3.1, and 3.5 will be another series. Each series consists of two short-term releases and one long-term release. Major changes to Joomla, such as a completely new administrator interface or changes to the way extensions are coded, would only be included at the start of a series. This policy was put into effect in the Joomla 1.6 to 1.7 transition.

There are minor differences between Joomla 1.6 and 1.7. For example, Joomla 1.7 has the ability to specify a background image on a custom HTML module, while Joomla 1.6 does not. However, Joomla 1.6 and 1.7 are about 98% similar from a site builder’s perspective. You should be able to followJoomla! 1.6 Essential TrainingandJoomla! 1.6: Creating and Editing Custom Templates with very little trouble using Joomla 1.7. The same should also be true for Joomla 2.5.

What about clients who are still running Joomla 1.5? Recently, I wrote an extensive Joomla! Community Magazine™ article describing the Joomla 1.5 to 2.5 transition, including business and technical considerations when planning those migrations. At my company, we are moving some Joomla 1.5 sites to Joomla 1.7 now. For other sites, we’ll move them early next year. We’ve started the process of notifying our clients about the upcoming migrations now, so they can organize their resources for the move. As for new sites, we are building them in Joomla 1.7 wherever possible.

Planning for the Joomla 3.x series began at an in-person planning session on October 21 in New York City. You can watch the video from the Joomla planning sessions as well. Watch for more Joomla videos coming to the lynda.com Online Training Library® soon!

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.