Our website will be down for scheduled maintenance on Thursday, September 18, at 11 p.m. Pacific Time and should be back up by Midnight. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Jeff Carlson | Thursday, August 28, 2014

Raw vs. JPEG in Photoshop: A Practical View

2014_08_27_RawJPG3

We humans always need some issue to take sides on. For photographers, the Great Debate is whether to shoot in Raw or JPEG mode.

The answer to the question is yes: You can make great photos using either format.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Blend Two Exposures into One

2014_06_10_DekeTek

Learn how to blend two exposures and get the best of both worlds with Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. Today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques shows you how to take an underexposed landscape photograph and create a lighter, brighter version of it to reveal all its detail—then combine the two images for a third, more dramatic image. As Deke explains, it’s just not possible to get the same effect with the Graduated Filter alone. It’s these two programs together that can help rescue your most extreme exposures.

Find out how to create a lighter version of the image with Camera Raw’s development tools, and combine the bright foreground with the darker sky of the original exposure using Photoshop’s masking capabilities. Deke also shows how to enhance the effect with a graduated filter and add a round of High Pass Sharpening to bring all the details of the final image into sharper relief. Click the free video to learn more.

Members of the lynda.com library can watch the follow-up movie to find out how to create the mask shown in this technique, from scratch. Then come back next week to learn how to create a photographic caricature using Photoshop’s Free Transform and Liquify tools.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Clean up a smartphone photo: Deke's Techniques

Clean up a smartphone image

Do you ever notice how a photo that looks great on your phone looks terrible on a larger screen? Images shot on iPhone and Android devices (even the newest models) tend to be low resolution and grainy. This can be disappointing when you have an image you want to share somewhere other than, well, your phone. Enter Adobe Camera Raw and the one and only Deke McClelland. In today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows how to clean up a noisy iPhone image using Camera Raw’s powerful toolset, including options like Clarity, Luminance, and Color and the Spot Removal tool. With a little extra help from Photoshop’s Smart Sharpen filter, Deke shows how to create a serviceable image that doesn’t scream “camera phone.”

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Mastering exposure in Camera Raw: Deke's Techniques

Mastering exposure in Camera Raw

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

Pop quiz: What exactly does the Exposure slider do in Adobe Camera Raw? Chances are some of you will say it controls highlight, some will claim it affects the midtones, and some will just throw up your hands. Deke McClelland is here to clear up any confusion you may have around this adjustment and help you master exposure in Camera Raw.

Today in Deke’s Techniques, he’ll help you take a dark, heavily shadowed image and bring out the brightness—and rugged handsomeness—of its subject: fellow lynda.com author James Williamson! (Did you know these guys hang out together? Worlds collide!) He’ll accomplish all of this using the controls in the Basic tab in Camera Raw, including the Exposure slider. He’ll also show how to avoid clipping your shadows and highlights, work directly in the histogram, and make other adjustments in the Effects tab to diminish any noise that might occur as the result of your exposure adjustment.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, September 12, 2013

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

ben

Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Deke's Techniques: Reduce noise with Camera Raw

Shooting with a limited amount of natural light at a high ISO can result in a lot of noise in your photos—like the image below that Deke shot in Carlsbad Caverns, 800 feet below ground. But if you have a high enough number of pixels, you can rescue the photo and smooth it into a print-worthy image with the assistance of Adobe Camera Raw.

Figure 1

By Lauren Harmon | Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Deke's Techniques: Creating an antique photo effect in Camera Raw

The final black and white conversion in Camera Raw

Welcome back to Deke’s Techniques. This week learn how to transform the Dunguaire Castle image from last week’s technique into a weathered black-and-white print with Adobe Photoshop and Camera Raw. We’ll balance the luminance levels to create the sepia tone, and we’ll add some film grain and vignetting. Let’s see how it works.

By Colleen Wheeler | Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Deke's Techniques: Creating filter effects with Camera Raw

The first time you try them out, Photoshop filters can be sort of fun, turning your images into a pastel drawing or giving them a chrome effect. But as Deke points out in this week’s free technique, you’ll soon realize that many of these built-in filters are nothing you’d actually want to use. So instead, Deke has used a familiar tool to a surprising purpose this week, by using Adobe Camera Raw to create some filter-like recipes that result in usable effects. And you don’t need to use raw-format photos to make it work, either.

He begins with this image (shot by lynda.com‘s own Jacob Cunningham), which does happen to be a raw image to which Deke applies conventional Camera Raw processing in order to set his starting point:

For his first effect, Deke uses a negative Clarity value to reduce the edge contrast and a negative Vibrance setting to leach out the most vivid colors in the image. He then adds back some saturation to return the glow of the model’s skin tone.

Next, Deke takes the same image, and applies a bleached effect that’s centered around the application of a drastic temperature reduction. Who needs Instagram when you have ACR?

The third effect emulates old school cross-processing (as if you were developing one kind of film with a process designed for another) by adjusting the temperature and tone, then setting vibrance and saturation at odds. The result is this interesting effect:

The next recipe applies an etched effect, which gives our good-natured model an almost other-worldly look. This part of the technique involves tweaking the Recovery, Fill, Blacks, Contrast, and Clarity values.

Finally, because you’ve undoubtedly come to expect extremes from Deke, he’ll show you how he used the Tone Curve to set the different levels inside the image at extremes with one another, resulting in this stark treatment:

Five photo-processing filters in under nine minutes. And all along, you’re applying your effect to duplicates of an original smart object, so everything is non-destructive and you can riff off of Deke’s ideas without harming your original image.

And if that’s not enough, members of the lynda.com Online Training Library® can view another new movie in which Deke shares his sixth and most outrageous filter effect inside Adobe Camera Raw. It’s Deke—you can occasionally question his taste but never his talent. And you never know what the inspirational effects of going over the edge might be.

Every week, there’s a free techniques from Deke!

Interested in more? • The entire Deke’s Techniques collection • courses on Photoshop in the Online Training Library® • courses by Deke McClelland in the Online Training Library®

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.