Learn it fast with expert-taught software and skills training at lynda.com. See what you can learn

By Derrick Story | Thursday, June 26, 2014

Moving from Aperture to Lightroom

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Every time I pack up and move from one house to another, I say, “I’m never doing this again!” Moving is laborious, tedious, and at times, frustrating.

Switching from Aperture to Lightroom can feel the same.

By Derrick Story | Friday, May 16, 2014

Spicing Up Aperture with Plugins and Presets

04-Apply-Adjustment-Preset

When will we see Aperture 4?

I get this question all the time.

The implication is that users want new tools for their favorite photo management app. I have no idea when we’ll see Aperture 4. But on my Mac, I’m exploring new image editing techniques all the time thanks to the app’s plugin architecture. Companies like onOne, Google, and Photomatix are supplying me with the ingredients to spice up my existing pictures.

By Derrick Story | Monday, May 12, 2014

The Unlimited Laptop and Aperture

The Unlimited Laptop and Aperture

If only our laptops held more photos. Life would be so much easier if we could combine the speed of today’s solid state drives and the vast storage of spinning platters. So how do you cope with the thousands of photos captured on that once-in-a-lifetime vacation abroad?

I face this situation all the time—not because I’m constantly on vacation to exotic lands, but because I’m an event photographer who spends a lot of time on the road. I travel with a MacBook Pro 15-inchRetina display laptop with a 256 GB SSD drive. I wouldn’t give up the speed of solid state storage for anything. And thanks to Aperture’s versatile library management, I don’t have to.

Here’s how I manage gigabytes of photos annually with just my laptop on the road and external storage at home.

By Derrick Story | Wednesday, April 16, 2014

5 tips for organizing your photos in Aperture

Manage your photos in Aperture

Your photo library is getting bigger every day—it’s a fact that photographers can’t escape in this age of digital and mobile photography. As your collection grows, it becomes more and more important to have an organization plan so you can find your images when you need them.

By adopting just a few simple practices, you can take advantage of one of Aperture’s strongest features: getting your image library in order.

By Richard Harrington | Friday, October 11, 2013

Mastering Shutter Speed

Master your shutter speed

Does your footage look too choppy? Are action scenes a streaky mess? It might be because your shutter speed isn’t set properly. The shutter in a camera is a lot like a pair of shutters on a window. It controls how much light comes through and hits the camera’s sensor.

This week, we continue to look at exposure. There are three critical pieces to achieving good exposure and creative control with your shots. Fortunately, shutter speed is the easiest to learn, with just a few simple rules.

By Richard Harrington | Friday, October 04, 2013

Mastering Aperture: DSLR Video Tips

Mastering the ApertureExplore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.[/caption]

How much light does your camera see? The aperture of your camera is its portal to the light in your scene (and without light, there are no pictures or video). Controlling the aperture is essential to getting the right amount of light on to your camera’s sensor to capture the best shots.

There’s another side to aperture as well. As you open the aperture wider, you can narrow the depth of field in your shot, blurring more of the frame outside of your immediate focus area. This is often a hallmark of the “DSLR video” look. Mastering aperture is critical to high-quality video and photos.

By Richard Harrington | Friday, September 27, 2013

Mastering exposure: DSLR Video Tips

Mastering the Exposure Triangle

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

When it comes to capturing great images, exposure is critical. Under- or overexpose your shot and you lose precious details. But setting the proper exposure isn’t easy; your light may move behind a cloud, or change over time. When shooting video, exposure requires an almost scientific understanding of light.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, September 12, 2013

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

ben

Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

Get the latest news

  •   New course releases
  •   Pro tips and tricks
  •   News and updates
  
New releases submit clicked

You can change your email preferences at any time. We will never sell your email. More info

Featured articles

A lynda.com membership includes:

Unlimited access to thousands of courses in our library
Certificates of completion
New courses added every week (almost every day!)
Course history to track your progress
Downloadable practice files
Playlists and bookmarks to organize your learning
Become a member

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.