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By Konrad Eek | Friday, March 20, 2015

Darkroom Equipment: Everything You Need and Where to Get It

find the darkroom equipment you need

The rise of digital cameras has spurred a surprising trend: The return to analog and black-and-white photography.

Sure, digital photography gives us amazing power and control, but there’s something irresistible about creating a tangible artifact of captured light that you’ve translated—through chemistry—into a work of art. Also, I’d argue that the luster, finish, and depth of tone of digital black-and-white prints can’t compare to those of gelatin silver prints.

Did you know that many of the tools you see in Photoshop every day are based on traditional darkroom techniques?

My new course Setting Up a Home Darkroom shows you how to create your own darkroom to make old-school-style prints.

In this article, I’ll help you decide what darkroom equipment you need, where to get it, and how to get the most for your money.

By Derrick Story | Friday, December 12, 2014

Rediscover Analog Photography with DxO FilmPack 5 Elite

Rediscover analog photography with DxO FilmPack 5

For years, Kodak Tri-X film was my favorite. I bought 100’rolls, then loaded my own 35mm cartridges. Each roll was hand-processed in Kodak D-76 developer, then printed using an Omega B22 enlarger. I still have many of those prints in my collection.

Since those days, I’ve moved from analog to digital, and without complaint. Photography is as exciting today as ever. But I do miss Tri-X film the same way that I miss my 64 blue VW bug and Yashica SLR (which, ironically, was stolen out of my VW, but that’s another story).

Like skinny ties, though, the good things in life have a way of coming back. I’m printing Tri-X again. This time the “darkroom” is DxO FilmPack 5 running my Mac laptop, and the “enlarger” is an Epson 13” printer.

By Jim Heid | Thursday, September 19, 2013

The Romance of Polaroid Photography

Peeling a Polaroid photo

These days, the phrase “instant photography” is almost redundant. A photo appears on the screen of your camera (or phone) a moment after you shoot it. And in a lot of cases, the photo can appear on the Internet a moment or two after that.

But it wasn’t always this way. For decades, the phrase “instant photography” meant “Polaroid.” If you didn’t want to wait for film to be developed, you used Polaroid cameras and films, which enabled you hold a finished print in your hand within a minute or two after shooting.

Amateurs loved Polaroid for that very reason: no taking film to the corner drugstore and then waiting. Professional photographers used Polaroid to make test shots. And some, including Ansel Adams, Andy Warhol, and William Wegman, used Polaroids to create enduring works of art.

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